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Courses in History (click course title for description)

HIST 101 Introduction to History: _____
An introduction to the study of history. The course will expose the student to the major issues and methods of historical study. This will be done through the study of a specific historical period or topical area. In the study of this period or topic, students will be introduced to schemes of interpretation, critical readings and analysis, primary sources, and evaluation of evidence. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 102 Introduction to History, Honors: _____
An introduction to the study of history. The course will expose the student to the major issues and methods of historical study. This will be done through the study of a specific historical period or topical area. In the study of this period or topic, students will be introduced to schemes of interpretation, critical readings and analysis, primary sources, and evaluation of evidence. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 103 Environment and History
Nature is our oldest home and newest challenge. This course surveys the environmental history of the earth from the extinction of the dinosaurs to the present with a focus on the changing ecological role of humans. It analyzes cases of ecological stability, compares cultural attitudes toward nature, and asks why this ancient relationship seems so troubled. (Same as EVRN 103.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 106 Introduction to Roman History
A general survey of the political, social, and economic developments of ancient Rome from 753 B.C. to 475 A.D. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 107 Introduction to the Ancient World
This course covers the history of the ancient Near East, Greece and Rome with emphasis on the origins of agriculture, writing, cities, empires, and democracy. Students will be introduced to schemes of interpretation, critical readings, and analysis, primary sources, and evaluation of evidence. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 108 Medieval History
The history of Europe from the Barbarian Invasions to the beginning of the 16th century. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 112 Introduction to British History
This course will introduce students to the concepts, issues, and methods of historical study, at the same time as it explores the main processes and events which shaped the history of Britain and its imperial dependencies. Students will be introduced to the nature and validity of different historical interpretations, and to the purpose and merit of historical writings. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Bailey, Victor
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 68122
HIST 113 Europe 1500-1789, Honors
An introduction to early modern European history, with emphasis on the cultural, political, economic, and social processes and events which helped to shape the modern world: The renaissance, the rise of the nation states, the Reformation, absolutism, and constitutionalism, the Enlightenment, and the coming of the French Revolution. Not open to students who have taken HIST 114. This Honors course is a Humanities Historical Studies Principal Course. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 121 Modern Latin America
Students are introduced to historical analysis within the context of the emergence of national identities and the process of modernization in the region. It also discusses key processes such as urbanization and industrialization and examines social movements for reform or revolution in the 20th Century. The course compares social, cultural, economic, and political changes across a variety of countries since 1810, giving particular attention to the legacies of colonialism. In this way the course deals with interpretations of the processes and movements and major issues of Latin American historiography. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 123 Modern Latin America, Honors
Similar in content to HIST 121. Students are introduced to historical analysis within the context of the emergence of national identities and the process of modernization in the region. The course compares social, cultural, economic, and political changes across a variety of countries since 1810, giving particular attention to the legacies of colonialism. It also discusses key processes such as urbanization and industrialization and examines social movements for reform and revolution in the 20th century. In this way the course deals with interpretations of these processes and movements and major issues of Latin American historiography. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 124 Latin American Culture and Society
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with the basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. (Same as LAA 100.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Nascimento Gregoire, Joao Batista
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 69004
LEC Nascimento Gregoire, Joao Batista
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 69005
HIST 128 History of the United States Through the Civil War
A historical survey of the United States from the peopling of the continent through the Civil War. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events which shaped that history. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Harvey, Douglas
MW 09:00-09:50 AM ST 330 - LAWRENCE
3 57501
DIS Harvey, Douglas
F 09:00-09:50 AM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 59291
DIS Harvey, Douglas
F 09:00-09:50 AM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 59292
DIS Harvey, Douglas
F 08:00-08:50 AM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 60707
DIS Harvey, Douglas
F 10:00-10:50 AM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 59293
DIS Harvey, Douglas
F 11:00-11:50 AM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 59294
DIS Harvey, Douglas
F 08:00-08:50 AM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 60708
DIS Harvey, Douglas
F 11:00-11:50 AM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 61199
DIS Harvey, Douglas
F 12:00-12:50 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 62420
DIS Harvey, Douglas
F 01:00-01:50 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 65821
HIST 129 History of the United States After the Civil War
A historical survey of the American people from Reconstruction to the present. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events that shaped American history. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Moran, Jeffrey
MW 11:00-11:50 AM WES 3139 - LAWRENCE
3 57271
DIS Moran, Jeffrey
F 11:00-11:50 AM WES 3134 - LAWRENCE
3 58021
DIS Moran, Jeffrey
F 11:00-11:50 AM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 65806
DIS Moran, Jeffrey
F 01:00-01:50 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 59295
DIS Moran, Jeffrey
F 10:00-10:50 AM WES 3134 - LAWRENCE
3 62418
DIS Moran, Jeffrey
F 09:00-09:50 AM WES 3134 - LAWRENCE
3 62419
DIS Moran, Jeffrey
F 12:00-12:50 PM WES 3134 - LAWRENCE
3 63823
DIS Moran, Jeffrey
F 01:00-01:50 PM WES 3134 - LAWRENCE
3 63824
DIS Moran, Jeffrey
F 02:00-02:50 PM WES 3134 - LAWRENCE
3 65807
DIS Moran, Jeffrey
F 12:00-12:50 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 65808
HIST 136 Early Science to 1700
Surveys the Western scientific tradition from roots in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Greece to the Scientific Revolution in seventeenth-century Europe. Focuses on the theoretical, methodological, and institutional development of the physical and bio-medical sciences. Addresses interactions of science with the technological, religious, philosophical, and social dimensions of Western culture. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 137 History of Modern Science
Surveys the history of science from the seventeenth century to the present with study of the changing theoretical, institutional, and social character of the scientific enterprise. Addresses physical, biological, and social sciences with attention to the chemical revolution at the turn of the nineteenth century, evolutionary biology, the new physics of the early twentieth century, and the professionalization of social science. Relates scientific changes to historical developments in technology, religion, national traditions in Europe and the USA, and non-Western cultures. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 140 Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change
This interdisciplinary course and laboratory sections survey the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 140 and GEOG 140.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 142 Global Environment II: The Ecology of Human Civilization
This interdisciplinary course and its laboratory sections survey the history of humanity's relationship with the natural world over the long term from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the evolution of Homo sapiens and cultural systems; the development of hunter, gatherer, fisher, agricultural, and pastoral lifeways; the ecology of colonialism and industrial civilization, and the emergence of ideological and ethical perspectives on the relationship between nature and culture. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to the humanity's engagement with the global environment using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 142 and GEOG 142) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brox, Ali
Cushman, Gregory
Vanderveen, Cornelis
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM JRP 150 - LAWRENCE
5 58151
LBN Klinger, Patrick
M 11:00-12:50 PM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 59993
LBN Cooper, David
W 09:00-10:50 AM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 59994
LBN Cooper, David
W 11:00-12:50 PM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 59995
LBN Klinger, Patrick
M 01:00-02:50 PM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 59996
HIST 144 Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change, Honors
This interdisciplinary course surveys the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as GEOG 144 and EVRN 144.) Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 145 Global Environment II: The Ecology of Human Civilization, Honors
This interdisciplinary course and its laboratory sections survey the history of humanity's relationship with the natural world over the long term from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics will include the evolution of Homo sapiens and cultural systems; the development of hunter, gatherer, fisher, agricultural, and pastoral lifeways; the ecology of colonialism and industrial civilization, and the emergence of ideological and ethical perspectives on the relationship between nature and culture. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to the humanity's engagement with the global environment using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 145 and GEOG 145.) Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brox, Ali
Cushman, Gregory
Vanderveen, Cornelis
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM JRP 150 - LAWRENCE
5 59997
LBN Brox, Ali
Cushman, Gregory
Vanderveen, Cornelis
F 09:00-10:50 AM SNOW 316 - LAWRENCE
5 59998
HIST 177 First Year Seminar: _____
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, organized around current issues in history. May not contribute to major requirements in history. First year seminar topics are coordinated and approved through the Office of First Year Experiences. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 190 Warlords and Rebels in Asia
Warlords tear apart society and try to rebuild it according to their own terms. Rebels challenge the status quo. This course provides an introduction to East Asian political, social, and cultural history through a thematic lens. The class offers students a diverse variety of perspectives on social and political change in East Asia and encourages them to reflect on such themes in Western contexts as well. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 191 Dawn of Japan
Where did the Japanese come from? What connects Japan to other civilizations in Asia? How did people in Japan in the ancient period live and try to understand their place in the universe? What role did women play as rulers and arbiters of culture? This introductory course traces the origins of Japanese civilization from prehistoric times to the twelfth century introducing key political, social, and cultural developments including the arrival of Buddhism, the development of the first cities, and the rise of the imperial court. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 205 History and the Headlines
In this course, we will follow current events and discuss their historical roots. Depending on what is happening in the news, we may learn more about some of the reasons the United States has problems with racial tensions, why the Mideast is in crisis, and how March Madness became a thing. The class features a weekly news quiz and the assignments will be written as if for a news outlet. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 206 Disasters in Mediterranean Antiquity
This course examines a variety of natural and man-made disasters in the ancient Mediterranean world including floods, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, famines, plagues, and tsunamis. Emphasis throughout is on exploring the range of impacts, responses, and attempts at recovery documented by ancient sources and proposed by modern scholars. The focus lies on primary evidence, ranging from the Bible to Greece and Rome via Egypt and Mesopotamia. The course aims to familiarize students with several types of catastrophic events that occurred in antiquity in order to gain an understanding of their effects on the environment and on decision making process. In addition to investigating what these disasters entailed, we seek to appreciate how they affected societies in various ways including economically, psychologically, and demographically, and how individuals and governments reacted and responded to these crises. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 210 Brazil and Africa: Atlantic Encounters
This is a survey course on the history of the relationships between Brazil and Western Africa from the sixteenth century onward. We examine the shape of the Atlantic world, the nature of the Portuguese empire in Brazil and Africa, the presence of Brazilian born agents in Western Africa, the cultural exchanges, the impact of colonial rule, and the responses of indigenous societies to these developments. Among the topics to receive attention are Brazil/Portuguese slave trade; slavery in Western Africa, urban and rural context of African slavery in Brazil; the family and religious life in both sides of the Atlantic; Brazilian communities in the coast of Africa; the abolition of slavery; and the long lasting relationships between Western Africa and Brazil. Students develop familiarity with major historical concepts, themes, and subjects. The course also aims to explore history as process to make sense of the past and the present. (Same as AAAS 210.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 215 A Global History of Money: Aristotle to Bitcoin
What is money? What does it enable, and why do we value it? Is money always the same thing? What are the relationships between money and wealth? Through examining how people across the world and over time used money and answered these questions, this course is an introduction to the global history of money in its myriad forms: gold coins, silver ingots, bonds, debts, cowry shells, and bricks of tea. It approaches money as a point of entry into themes in political, cultural, intellectual, and social history. As such, it is not a course in economic or business history, but a historical examination of how money has transformed our world. We read and view a wide range of secondary and primary sources, ranging from images of money itself to recent works by anthropologists, historians, and economists. (Same as GIST 215.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 220 A Global History of Human Health
This course surveys how human populations have experienced diseases including those induced by infectious microbes, environmental agents, and dietary causes from prehistoric hunter -gatherer societies to today's global population. Particular emphasis is on major transitions and historical events that have had led to major epidemics. These transitions and events include but are not limited to the transition to agriculture, urbanization, imperial expansion, colonialism, industrialization, world wars, factory farming, and the transportation revolution. The development of medicine, public policies, and global health organizations is a central theme as is the development of global health disparities. Students are challenged to think historically and apply a long-term perspective to understand today's global health problems. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 227 America's Worst Presidents
Who were America's worst presidents and why? In this course, we'll consider what makes for a successful presidency, then examine how and why things went wrong for half a dozen chief executives. Students are welcome to challenge the professor's choices. Students will evaluate a presidency of their choice in the final project. SEM.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 229 United States in the 1960s
In the Sixties, millions of Americans rejected socially-sanctioned established wisdom, long-standing cultural precepts and conventional political policies and practices. In this gateway course we will examine how and why they did so, why so many other Americans rejected their challenges to the status quo, and what difference these rebellions made in Americans' lives. By placing their struggles in historical context, we will think about how and why people make and resist social change and how historical circumstances restrain and enable people's individual and collective ability to act and to make their own futures. Through readings, lectures, discussion, and various assignments students will have opportunities to debate the great questions of that era and ponder the relevance of historical events and understandings to their own lives and to the life of the nation, as they sharpen their analytic abilities and their capacity to communicate those analyses effectively. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 231 War and 20th Century U.S
This course analyzes the "cultural construction" of war in 20th century America by focusing primarily on World War II and the Vietnam War. How have Americans attempted to come to terms with the wars they have fought? How have Americans' cultural understandings shaped the wars they have waged? How have Americans used various cultural forms (film, music, photography, etc.) to support a war effort or to protest against it? We pay special attention to the place of the military in American society, to notions of patriotism and citizenship, to constructions of gender, race, and sexuality, and to the roles of government, media, technology, and public opinion. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 250 Study Abroad Topics in: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in History at the freshman/sophomore level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 301 The Historian's Craft
This course introduces students to the practice and methods of the study of history and serves as the gateway to the major. Students learn (1) to think historically; (2) to understand how historians construct and write about the past through narratives, theory and analytical discussion; (3) to critically evaluate historical arguments and the material used to substantiate those arguments, including an introduction to the process of peer review; (4) to develop writing and research skills including the interpretation of primary sources; and (5) to master professional standards of presenting their findings. This course is required of all history majors and is a prerequisite for HIST 696 Seminar in:________. Prerequisite: Open only to declared History majors or by consent of instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hagel, Jonathan
MW 12:30-01:45 PM ROB 201 - LAWRENCE
3 62378
LEC
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM SMI 108 - LAWRENCE
3 58695
LEC
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 65809
HIST 302 The Historian's Craft, Honors
This course introduces students to the practice and methods of the study of history and serves as the gateway to the major. Students learn (1) to think historically; (2) to understand how historians construct and write about the past through narratives, theory and analytical discussion; (3) to critically evaluate historical arguments and the material used to substantiate those arguments, including an introduction to the process of peer review; (4) to develop writing and research skills including the interpretation of primary sources; and (5) to master professional standards of presenting their findings. This course, or HIST 301 - its non-honors equivalent, is required of all history majors and is a prerequisite for HIST 696 Seminar in:________. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program who are declared History majors, or by consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 303 Sin Cities
This course offers a comparative global introduction to the history of the modern city by looking at the ways in which certain metropoli developed an attractive underbelly of decadence at the same time as they sought to be centers of refined and orderly cosmopolitan life. The course examines topics such as popular culture, gambling, prostitution, crime, violence, nightlife, tourism, and corruption in the context of the increased social mobility that characterized the beginning of the industrial age and that has extended into the 21st century. Students investigate the changing relation between work and leisure, spectacle and consumerism, and urban space and the struggle for order. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 304 1642, 1688, 1776: Three British Revolutions
Explains and analyzes the three revolutions in the English-speaking world which, more than any others, are held to have laid the foundations of modernity. Themes discussed include social, intellectual, and political developments, structures, and conflicts. 1642 and 1688 are treated in the setting of England's relations with Scotland and Ireland, and against the background of European wars of religion. 1776 is analyzed in a transatlantic context as a civil war within the wider British polity. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 305 The Scientific Revolution
Describes and analyzes the factors producing a Scientific Revolution in early-modern Europe. Focuses on fundamental changes in astronomy-cosmology, physics, and biology from Copernicus to Newton. Examines the emergence of experimental method as an essential part of Western science. Portrays the development of new forms of scientific organization and the cultural frameworks that bore and shaped them. Surveys the various interpretations of this period expressed by current historians of science. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 306 Science and Western Culture
Analyzes the institutional, social, technological, and political circumstances of science in the Western tradition. Examines the place of science in pre-modern European settings. Emphasizes the shifting centers of national scientific prominence since the seventeenth century from Italy to Britain to France to Germany to the USA. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 307 Modern Africa, Honors
An intensive version of HIST 300. A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles. Themes may include resistance, liberation, nationalism, gender issues, agriculture, genocide, and human rights. (Same as AAAS 307.) Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by consent of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 308 Key Themes in Modern Global History
A comparative historical analysis of major global developments from the late 15th century to the present. Some of the themes likely to be explored are empire-building, contact between cultures and colonial social relations; the attraction of cities, their role in a global economy and the shift to an urban world; and the impact of capitalism and industrialization on social organization including conflict between classes and changes in the nature of work. Students learn ways of interpreting primary historical documents and comparing historical investigations across time and space. (Same as GIST 308.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 309 History of Chemistry
Birth of modern chemical science from roots in Greek natural philosophy, alchemy, Renaissance medicine, and technology. The Chemical Revolution of Lavoisier and Dalton. Maturity of chemistry in the19th and 20th centuries, along with an examination of the growth of chemical institutions and the rise of chemical industry. Emphasis on developments from the 18th century to the present. (Same as CHEM 309.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 310 American Culture, 1600-1876
An examination of the major historical shifts, trends, and conflicts that have shaped the multicultural nature of life in the United States from the initial European settlements to 1876. In addition to tracing developments in literature, architecture, drama, music, and the visual arts, this course will investigate patterns and changes in the popular, domestic, and material culture of everyday life in America. (Same as AMS 310.) Prerequisite: AMS 100 or AMS 110 or HIST 128. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 311 Great Lives in Science
This course examines the lives of selected great scientists. Lectures and biographical readings deal with scientists who lived in the period between the seventeenth century and the present. Through comparative biography, the course assesses the theoretical, methodological, institutional, and social development of modern science. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 312 American Culture, 1877 to the Present
An examination of the major historical shifts, trends, and conflicts that have shaped the multicultural nature of life in the United States from 1877 to the present. In addition to tracing developments in literature, architecture, drama, music and the visual arts, this course investigates patterns and changes in the popular, domestic, and material culture of everyday life in America. (Same as AMS 312.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Edwards, Tai
W 04:00-06:30 PM SUM 424 - LAWRENCE
3 61798
HIST 313 Conspiracies and Paranoia in American History
The theme of conspiracy is a recurring motif in American history. This course uses a case-study method to revisit episodes such as the Salem witch trials, the movement against freemasonry, the Slave Power conspiracy, and more recent obsessions such as UFOs and the assassination of John F. Kennedy to explain why so many Americans have embraced conspiracy theories to explain mysterious events and dramatic social change. The course will rely on primary accounts, fiction, and film, as well as secondary historical literature, to examine both "real" and "imaginary" conspiracies and their effects on the politics, culture, and society of the United States. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 314 Globalization: History and Theory
Explores the rise of global capitalism in the 19th and 20th centuries, contemporary debates about 21st century globalization, and the role of globalization in our everyday lives. Questions considered include: Is globalization an incremental process that has been going on for centuries, or it is a dramatic new force reshaping the post-Cold War world? Is it a cultural and social process or an economic and political one? Or is it all of these things? Not open to students who have completed HIST 315. (Same as GIST 314.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 316 Ministers and Magicians: Black Religions from Slavery to the Present
This course examines the history and diversity of African American religious expression from slavery until the present, emphasizing both mainstream and alternative faiths. It covers the religious world views of enslaved Africans, and examines faiths inside and outside of Christianity. Topics may include: independent black churches, magical practices, the Holiness and Pentecostal movements, black Islam, religious freemasonry, and esoteric faiths. The class emphasizes the influence of gender, class, race, migration, and urbanization on black religion. (Same as AAAS 316 and AMS 316.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 317 African American Women: Colonial Era to the Present
This interdisciplinary course covers the history of African American women, beginning in West and Central Africa, extending across the Middle Passage into the Americas, and stretching through enslavement and freedom into the 21st century. The readings cover their experiences through secondary and tertiary source materials, as well as autobiographies and letters, plays and music, and poems, novels, and speeches. (Same as AAAS 317, AMS 317, and WGSS 317.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 318 Indian Territory
This course examines the cultural, social, economic, environmental, and political history of Indian Territory in what is now the state of Oklahoma. It surveys the diverse geographical regions, tribal cultures, the impact of Indian Removal Act, assimilation, acculturation, westward expansion, the Civil War, boarding schools, the Dawes Act, the Curtis Act, and land runs on Indian Territory residents. The course also treats post-Civil War violence, outlaws, and the role of tribal courts along with controversies over removals, Land Run celebrations, allotment scandals, and Osage oil murders. (Same as HWC 345 and ISP 345.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 319 History, Women, and Diversity in the U.S
This survey course explores the history of being female in America through a focus on the ways differences in race, sexuality, ethnicity, class, and life cycle have shaped various aspects of women's lives. Themes to be explored could include, but are not limited to: social and political activism; intellectual developments; family; women's communities; work; sexuality; and culture. (Same as WGSS 319.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 324 History of Women and the Body
This course examines different notions about women and their bodies from a historical perspective. It discusses the arguments and circumstances that have shaped women's lives in relation to their bodies, and women's responses to those arguments and circumstances. This course covers a wide geographical and chronological spectrum, from Ancient societies to the present, from Latin America and the Middle East, to North America and Western Europe. (Same as WGSS 324.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 325 The Spanish Inquisition
A broad historical study of the Spanish Inquisition from 1478 to its afterlife in modern culture, including its use in political debates and its depiction in popular culture. Topics include anti-Semitism, the nature of the inquisitorial investigation, the use of torture, censorship and the relationship between the Inquisition, the Spanish monarchy and other religious and lay authorities. Taught in English. Will not count toward the Spanish major. (Same as JWSH 315 and SPAN 302.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 327 The Premodern Middle East
A survey of the history of the Middle East from the origins of Islam in the seventh century to the rise and consolidation of the Ottoman Empire in the eighteenth century. Lectures and discussions focus on diversity within the Middle East at the height of the Islamic empires. Topics include the life of Muhammad and early Islamic communities, expansion of Islam into Asia, Africa and Europe, intellectual strength in the medieval period, and the everyday lives of women, Christians, Jews and other minority groups. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 328 The Modern Middle East
A survey of the history of the Middle East from 1800 to the present. Lectures and discussions focus on diversity within the Middle East over two centuries of major political and cultural change. Topics include causes for the decline of the Ottoman Empire, debates over modernization, European imperialism and the formation of nation-states, twentieth century cultural revolutions and women's activism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the revival of Islamic social movements. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 329 History of War and Peace
A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, and San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war, and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as EURS 329 and PCS 329.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 330 Revolt and Revolution in Early Modern Europe
A study of forces giving rise to riots, rebellions, and revolution in Western Europe from 1600-1790. The course will examine social and ideological aspects of famine, religious persecution, taxation, war, landlord-peasant relations, and the increasing power of kings. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 331 Atlantic Societies, 1450-1800: A Comparative History of European Colonization
This course offers a comparative history of the European (Portuguese, Spanish, French, English, and Dutch) colonization of the Americas. It examines the interaction among peoples and cultures across the Atlantic, from the age of European exploration to the start of the independence movements in the Americas. Themes that will receive special attention include: comparing patterns of colonization, the forging of American societies of European, Native American, and African cultures, the slave trade, and the history of sugar production. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 332 Sex in History
This course offers a survey of the history of human sexuality in the Western world; the second half of the semester emphasizes the American experience. Topics for consideration may include: masturbation, pornography, sex work, homosexuality, bisexuality, "perversions" (paraphilias), sex and marriage, racialized sexualities, sexual violence, trans* identities and experiences, sexuality and national identities, and colonialized sexualities. The course demonstrates the various ways in which sex, specifically the social and political meanings attributed to physical acts, changes over time and shapes human experiences and interactions far beyond the bedroom. (Same as AMS 323, HUM 332 and WGSS 311.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Forth, Christopher
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM MAL 2001 - LAWRENCE
3 66095
HIST 333 Eurometro: Visions of the European Metropolis, 1849-1939
This course investigates the interrelated symbols of the European metropolis during the "Age of Great Cities", from the filth of the sewers to the "filthiness" of prostitution. Students investigate gender and class in the metropolis by exploring a few stereotypes: the juvenile delinquent, the woman on the street, and the flaneur. The course format stresses discussion of common texts, including short readings of literature from the period and historical scholarship. Students also analyze contemporary photographs, art, architecture, and advertising. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 334 The Great War: The History of World War I
A historical survey of the causes, course, and consequences of the conflict, 1878-1919, stressing its socio-economic dimensions as well as its political ramifications and military aspects. Considerable use will be made of visual aids. No prerequisites. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Wood, Nathaniel
MW 11:00-12:15 PM HAW 1005 - LAWRENCE
3 62394
HIST 335 History of Jewish Women
This course explores the history of Jewish women from antiquity to the twentieth century. It examines the historical constructions of women's gender roles and identities in Jewish law and custom as well as the social and cultural impact of those constructions in the context of the realities of women''s lives in both Jewish and non-Jewish society. (Same as JWSH 335, WGSS 335.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 336 Ethics, Ideas, and Nature
This course examines the ethical frameworks developed for thinking about, using, and protecting the natural world. Examples of topics include indigenous approaches to nature, the history of ecological ideas, environmental movements, the role of the state of managing resources, utilitarianism and progressivism, environmental lawmaking, wilderness advocacy, nature and theology, the rights of nature, and environmental justice. Students are introduced to the theories of duty ethics, justice ethics, utilitarianism, and right ethics, and required to apply ethical decision making to contemporary and historical environmental issues. Multiple perspectives on the history of human interactions with nature demonstrate the importance of reflecting upon the value systems inherent in human-centered environmental ethics and nature-centered environmental ethics. (Same as EVRN 336.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Boynton, Alex
MW 11:00-12:15 PM MS 106 - LAWRENCE
3 62680
LEC Boynton, Alex
MW 03:00-04:15 PM WES 4007 - LAWRENCE
3 62681
HIST 337 History, Ethics, Modernity
This course will examine the question "How has human dignity been preserved or violated in the modern age?" Cast in a global framework, some of the probable themes are the history of human rights; the moral universe of genocide; the (in)dignity of industrial work; the shifting status of the poor and the colonized and their treatment by the state and society; the impact of changing technology on ethics in war, peace and the environment; and the violation of dignity as a factor in collective resistance. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 338 African American Urban Community and Class in the Midwest
This course provides historical perspective on African Americans and the politics of economic class within black urban spaces from the end of Reconstruction to the post-World War II era. It focuses on the development of an upwardly mobile urban black middle class, and impoverished black urban "underclass," since the 1960s. Students are encouraged to have taken one of three courses: AAAS 104, AAAS 106, or AAAS 306. (Same as AAAS 328.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 339 Screening Germany: The Tumultuous Twentieth Century through Film
This course traces the history of twentieth-century Germany through the medium of film. We will view a wide array of films, from turn-of-the-century silent films and Nazi propaganda to Cold War-era East German entertainments and recent depictions of the German past. We will view films critically and develop the tools and vocabulary to analyze them as historical sources. We will also contextualize the films through a wide range of primary and secondary source readings, demonstrating how film served as a tool of political power, social criticism, and national identification in Germany's tumultuous twentieth century. (Same as EURS 339.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 340 The History of the Second World War
A survey of the origins, course, and consequences of the war, 1930-1945. Political, economic, military, and social aspects will be dealt with in the context of their global effects. Extensive use will be made of motion pictures and other media. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 341 Hitler and Nazi Germany
An examination of the rise of Hitler and Nazism, beginning with the breakdown of 19th century culture in the First World War and continuing through the failure of democracy under the Weimar Republic. The course will also discuss the impact of Nazism on Germany and how Nazism led to the Second World War and the Holocaust. (Same as JWSH 341.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 342 Medieval to Early Modern Jewish History
This course surveys the political, economic, social, and cultural experience of Jews in the medieval and early modern periods, from the sixth through the seventeenth centuries. It examines Jewish life in the Mediterranean diaspora, the Iberian Peninsula, and Christian Europe and considers the impact of Jewish communities on the non-Jewish host societies in which they settled. (Same as JWSH 342.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 343 The Holocaust in History
The systematic murder of the Jews of Europe by the Nazis during World War II is one of the most important events of modern history. This course studies the Holocaust by asking about its place in history. It compares other attempted genocides with the Holocaust and examines why most historians argue that it is unique. Other topics covered include the reasons the Holocaust occurred in Europe when it did, the changing role of anti-Semitism, and the effects of the Holocaust on civilization. The course also discusses why some people have sought to deny the Holocaust. The course concludes by discussing the questions people have raised about the Holocaust and such issues as support for democracy, the belief in progress, the role of science, and the search for human values which are common to all societies. (Same as JWSH 343.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Sternberg, Frances
Tu 02:30-05:00 PM SUM 506 - LAWRENCE
3 62509
HIST 344 Modern Jewish History
This course explores the complex of interactions between Jews, Judaism, and modernity by examining the challenges to Jewish life and thought, community and culture, self-understanding and survival, from the early modern period to the present day. Through the lenses of religious, cultural, intellectual, and political expression, the course examines the social, economic, and demographic changes in Jewish communities in Western, Central and Eastern Europe, the United States, and Israel along with the impact of antisemitism and the Holocaust. (Same as JWSH 344.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 345 Hard Times: The Depression Years in America, 1929-1941
An analysis of the experiences of the American people during the Great Depression. Attention will also be given to the global dimensions of the crisis, socioeconomic dislocation, cultural and institutional change, and the impact of the Asian and European wars. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 346 Law and Society in America
Law and lawyers have powerfully shaped American values and institutions. This course explores law's impact on American society from the age of European colonization through present. Topics include liberty, public order, race and ethnicity, the family, property, speech, environment, and self-government. The course also examines the changing images of lawyers and the law over time. Course materials include not just statutes and court decisions, but literature, imagery, and popular culture materials. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 347 Environmental History of North America
A survey of changes in the landscape and in people's perceptions of the natural world from 1500 to present. Topics include agroecology, water and energy, the impact of capitalism, industrialism, urbanization, and such technologies as the automobile, and the origins of conservation. (Same as EVRN 347.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC
MW 10:00-10:50 AM MAL 2001 - LAWRENCE
3 65854
DIS Gregg, Sara
F 12:00-12:50 PM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 65855
DIS Gregg, Sara
F 01:00-01:50 PM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 65856
DIS Gregg, Sara
F 10:00-10:50 AM MS 106 - LAWRENCE
3 65857
DIS Gregg, Sara
F 10:00-10:50 AM MS 105 - LAWRENCE
3 65858
HIST 348 History of the Peoples of Kansas
A survey of culture and society in Kansas from prehistory to the present. Topics include Native American life, Euro-American resettlement, Bleeding Kansas and the Civil War, agricultural settlement, urbanization and industrialization, depression and recovery, and modern Kansas in transition. Emphasis in the course will be on social and economic conditions, the experience of ethnic and racial groups, inter-racial relations, and the role of women. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hagel, Jonathan
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 64666
HIST 350 The Korean War, 1950-1953
An examination of the origins, pattern of development, and legacy of this still unsettled conflict, which in many ways set the tone for the entire post-1945 era of the Cold War. Points of emphasis will include the motives and policies of the major participants (Koreans, Americans, Chinese, and Soviets), as well as the effects of the war on their domestic politics and foreign policy positions. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Lewis, Adrian
MW 12:30-01:45 PM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 62392
HIST 351 American Indian and White Relations to 1865
This course provides an intensive survey of the Indians of North America from Prehistory to 1865, and focuses on ancient indigenous cultures, early European-Indian relations and the impact of European culture upon the indigenous peoples of North America. (Same as HWC 348, ISP 348.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Mihesuah, Devon
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 64295
HIST 352 American Indians Since 1865
This course examines American Indian/White relations from reconstruction to the present. It surveys the impact of westward expansion and cultural changes brought about by the Civil War, forced education, intermarriage, the Dawes Act, the New Deal, the World Wars, termination, relocation and stereotypical literature and movies. The class also addresses the Red Power and AIM movements, as well as indigenous efforts to decolonize and to recover and retain indigenous knowledge. After learning about the past from both Native and non-Native source materials, students will multiple perspectives about historical events and gain understandings of diverse world views, values, and responses to adversity. (Same as HWC 350 and ISP 350.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 354 Spanish Borderlands in North America
The Northern frontier provinces of the Viceroyalty of New Spain from their exploration and occupation by Spain until their absorption by the United States. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 358 The Vietnam War
This course is a survey of the Vietnam War. It covers the early days of Cold War, 1945-54, and all phases of the Vietnam War: the advisory phase (1955-64); the Americanization phase (1965 -68); the Vietnamization Phase (1969-73); and the final phase, the Vietnam Civil War, 1972-75. This course covers the causes, course, conduct, and consequences of the war and in so doing provides a political, military, and social history of the war. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 359 The Black Experience in the U.S
An interdisciplinary study of the history and culture of Black people in American from Reconstruction to the present. Topics covered include an analysis of Reconstruction, Black leaders, organizations and movements, the Harlem Renaissance, migration, and race relations. Demographic variables covered include socio-economic class, education, political persuasion, and influence by avant-garde culture changes. (Same as AAAS 306.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Jelks, Randal
MW 03:00-04:15 PM BA 110 - LAWRENCE
3 68702
HIST 360 Science and Religion
The interaction and significant confrontations between science and religion will be considered together with the religious responses to science and technology. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 361 Youth, Sex, and Romance in Post-WWII United States
Most people don't think of sex and romance as having a history. And youth seems just a natural stage of life. But the nature of "courtship," the definitions of sex, and the meaning of "youth" have changed dramatically over time, and people struggle over those definitions right up to the current day. In this class we try to make historical sense of those struggles by focusing on a volatile and complicated period in U.S. history: the years from World War II through the recent past. (Same as WGSS 361.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 362 The American Way of War Since World War II
This course is a survey of American Military History from World War II to current military operations. It covers the Cold War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, both Persian Gulf wars, the global war on terrorism, and the war in Afghanistan. The course examines the causes, course, conduct, and consequences of the wars and covers advances in technology and doctrine, civil-military relations, foreign policy, and inter-service rivalry, providing a political, military, and cultural history of the wars. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 365 Invention of the Tropics
This course surveys the history of the tropical environment and its peoples from Europe's first encounter to today's ecotourism boom. It focuses on portrayals of the tropics in historical travel accounts and films. Through these sources, we seek to understand how science, technology, and tourism have been used, in turn, as instruments of progress and destruction, tools of empire and national liberation. Case studies are drawn from Latin America, Africa, Oceania, and Asia. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 366 Old Regime and Revolution in France, 1648-1799
This course explores the political, social and cultural system of early modern France. It culminates with study of the collapse of monarchy and establishment of republican government during the French Revolution. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 367 Magic and Superstition in European History
This course traces the changing role and understanding of magic in European culture, religion, politics and science from the late Middle Ages through the early 20th century. Topics may include alchemy, miracles, magical healing, witchcraft, monsters and demonic possession. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 368 A History of Afro-Latin America
This course examines the history of Africans and their descendants in Latin America. In this region, Africans could be found serving as militia commanders, laboring as skilled tradesmen, running their own businesses, working as household servants, and toiling on plantations. Students will study the varied experiences of these men and women across colonial and national boundaries. Topics include: acculturation/ Creolization, manumission, family formation, social networks, economic roles, political mobilization, and interaction with indigenous peoples. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 369 Colonialism and Revolution in the Third World, Honors
This course will study the structure and dynamics of colonialism and neo-colonialism in the third world beginning in the 19th Century and continuing to the 1980s. It will also examine responses to these systems, from small-scale resistance to nationalist revolutions. Attention will be given to the relationship between ideology and collective behavior. Case studies will be drawn from Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 370 Violence and Conflict in Latin American History
This course treats the history of Latin America since the European conquest through the prism of violence and social conflict. It traces the roots of the region's social collapse during the twentieth century to political and cultural factors in the colonial and early national periods. Using films and literature in addition to historical texts, the course discusses the sources of nationalism, civil wars, banditry, urbanization, violent dissent, military dictatorships, human rights abuses and guerrilla insurgencies as well as the political uses of violence made by different social groups. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 371 The Cultural History of Modern Latin America
This course explores themes such as the evolution of national identities, the conflict between the city and the countryside, exile, the surrealist imagination and the cultural resistance against foreign influences through an examination of the literature, film, art, music, religions and popular and material culture of 19th and 20th century Latin America. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Rosenthal, Anton
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 4002 - LAWRENCE
3 65864
HIST 372 Violence and Conflict in Latin American History, Honors
This course treats the history of Latin America since the European conquest through the prism of violence and social conflict. It traces the roots of the region's social collapse during the 20th century to political and cultural factors in the colonial and early national periods. Using films and literature in addition to historical texts, the course discusses the sources of nationalism, civil wars, banditry, urbanization, violent dissent, military dictatorships, human rights abuses, and guerrilla insurgencies as well as the political uses of violence made by different social groups. Not open to students who have taken HIST 370. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 373 The Supreme Court and Religious Issues in the United States
Historical study of the interpretation of the religion clauses of the First Amendment with special reference to the questions of establishment, the free exercise of religion, freedom of religious belief, worship, and action, and religion and the public schools. Not open to freshmen. (Same as REL 373.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Morgan, Andrew
TuTh 01:00-02:15 PM SMI 206 - LAWRENCE
3 65180
HIST 375 The Supreme Court and Religious Issues in the United States, Honors
Historical study of the interpretation of the religion clauses of the First Amendment with special reference to the questions of establishment, the free exercise of religion, freedom of religious belief, worship, and action, and religion and the public schools. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. (Same as REL 375.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 376 Immigrants, Refugees, and Diasporas
This course looks at people who choose to cross political borders, are forced to flee beyond them, or constitute ethnic minorities living outside a homeland. Examining these groups from a global historical perspective, this course explores how ethical debates about the rights of non-citizens and ethnic outsiders have evolved in the modern age. Students learn about important issues that have affected the lives of immigrants, refugees, and diasporas, including citizenship, mobility, cultural representation, asylum policies, and the concept of human rights. The course concludes with a look at contemporary manifestations of these issues, from debates over the place of Muslims in Europe to discussions about immigration policy in the United States. (Same as GIST 376.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 377 Everyday Communism in Eastern Europe
This course investigates through film, literature, memoirs, photography, architecture, and scholarship the experience of ordinary citizens under Soviet-style communism in Eastern Europe. We study the ways people supported, resisted, opposed, and merely got by under state socialism from the late 1940s to the collapse of Communism in 1989. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 378 Beyond the Iron Curtain: Soviet Perspectives on the Cold War
This course reimagines the Cold War through Soviet eyes, challenging assumptions and offering less familiar perspectives on a global conflict. Analyzing Soviet and American mass media, popular culture, declassified documents, and personal stories, students investigate the following: Who started the Cold War, and who won it? Was it a time of relative peace or paranoia? How did the two sides view each other and did espionage help them know each other better? How did people and culture sometimes cross the iron curtain? What were the Soviets doing in places like Latin America and the Middle East? And why were both sides so concerned with Olympic athletes, ballet defectors, and cosmonauts? LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 379 Europe in Crisis: Empire, Extremism, and War, 1890-1945
This course examines the sense of crisis that defined European life in the first half of the twentieth century, an era defined by economic spasms, cultural revolts, extreme political ideologies, and two massively destructive world wars. We will examine the period between 1890 and 1945 as a violent, at times apocalyptic, clash between three competing ideologies - communism, fascism, and liberal democracy -demonstrating how extremism both fed upon and created a sense of crisis. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 380 Revolutionary Europe: The People in Arms
A survey of the political, social, economic and cultural transformation of Europe in a century of turmoil, from the Old Regime through the liberal and national revolts of 1848, the Paris Commune and the Russian Revolution. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 381 Enemies of Ancient Israel
An exploration of the social world of the Bible through its antagonists and their cultures. We will examine the so-called "Bad Guys of the Bible" using the lenses of history, archaeology, geography, and religion to better understand their cultures and how they are portrayed in the biblical text. (Same as JWSH 387 and REL 387.) LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Welch, Eric
TuTh 08:00-09:15 AM WES 1009 - LAWRENCE
3 68347
HIST 382 Jerusalem Through the Ages
As a prominent site in the religious and cultural histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, Jerusalem is uniquely situated as one of the world's most sacred cities. For more than 3,000 years, this city has been a focal point of religious and political activity. Through the critical reading of historical and religious texts, and archaeological data, this course will explore the historical development of Jerusalem as a sacred place in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (Same as CLSX 382, JWSH 382 and REL 382.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 385 Themes in British History
For students enrolled in the annual summer Study Abroad program. This course examines some of the main events and trends in British history, from the earliest times to recent British history. The specific historical themes investigated will depend upon the instructor. The course can be taken only via enrollment in the KU British Summer Institute in the Humanities. Prerequisite: Approval for enrollment in the Summer Institute through the Study Abroad office. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 390 Topics in: _____
A study of a specialized theme or topic in History. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Zimdars-Swartz, Paul
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM SMI 206 - LAWRENCE
3 64989
LEC
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM ST 338B - LAWRENCE
3 68485
LEC Sternberg, Frances
W 06:00-08:30 PM REGN 152 - EDWARDS
3 68333
HIST 391 Topics in (Honors): _____
A study of a specialized theme or topic in History. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 392 Huns, Turks, and Mongols: The Nomad Factor in Asian History
This course introduces the history of major nomadic powers in Eurasian Steppe and their impact in the world from the first Millennium BCE to around 1500 AD. The main topics include the culture of the Scythians, the Hun and Xiongnu confederacy, the Mongol conquest, and the Turkish empires in Central and West Asia. It investigates the natural and human forces that shape the identities of the nomads and their changing images in history. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 393 The Silk Road
A comprehensive introduction to the cultural influence and material exchange among major civilizations along the Silk Road. It covers the period of more than one thousand years between the 2nd and the 15th centuries CE, during which time forces wielded by the Persians, the Chinese, the Indians, the Tibetans and the Mongols shaped the geopolitical landscape of the vast region that spreads from the Caspian Sea to the Gobi Desert. Students explore the role of the Silk Road in the formation of the religious and ethnic identities of these civilizations, as well as their perceptions towards one another. Along with textual materials, the course uses extensive visual and musical materials to present interesting phenomena, such as Sogdian burial practice, Arab accounts of Tang China, Nestorial Christianity at the Mongol court, and Marco Polo's journey to the East. The course begins and concludes with discussion of the contemporary significance of the Silk Road as a historical category. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 394 Made in China: Chinese Business History
This course examines the development of business culture in China since 1900. Looking particularly at how it has transformed and adapted in response to China's own changing political environment as well as China's changing engagement with the West and Japan. We examine cases of western businesses in China and Chinese businesses in both China and the West. Topics include the rise of industrialism, the role of foreign investment, China's role in the global market place, the relationship between business and the state, state-run enterprises, factory life, entrepreneurialism, advertising, consumerism, and economic nationalism. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 398 Introduction to History of Japan: Anime to Zen
This course provides a foundation for study of Japanese history. It combines lectures on the scope of Japanese history over the past 2,000 years with discussions of topics key to the development of Japanese civilization such as religion and literature. We analyze how different media, such as film, Japanese animation (anime), and art can be used as historical sources, and how these shape our understanding of Japan. Students hone their ability to analyze both thematic and historical questions through writing assignments and discussions. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 401 Case Studies in: _____
Examination of a limited aspect of a general subject; other aspects of the same subject may be offered other semesters. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 402 Roman Military History
The Defense of the Roman Frontiers. This course emphasizes the development of the frontiers of the Roman empire from Caesar to the late second century. It includes the origins of the Germans and their society, the Celtic background, and the relationship between the emperor and the army. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 404 Technology: Its Past and Its Future
An examination of the role of technology and its influence on society. The historical development of technology will be traced up to modern times with an emphasis on its relations to the humanities. Attention will be given to the future of different branches of technology and alternative programs for their implementation. (Same as ENGR 304.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 407 History of Science in the United States
Traces the evolution of a scientific tradition in American culture. Examines the growth of scientific ideas and institutions under European and indigenous influences. Studies the interactions of science with technological, theological, political, and socio-economic developments. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 410 The American Revolution
This course will focus on the meaning the American Revolution had for different groups of Americans. Particular emphasis will be on the relationship between ideology and experience, and the impact of the Revolution on such groups as women, slaves, Indians, African-Americans, the poor, merchants, and loyalists. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 411 The New Republic: U.S
This course traces the history of the United States from the debates over the ratification of the Constitution until 1848. Major topics include the republican experiment, the Market Revolution, the Age of Jackson, religious revivals and reform, slavery and the cotton kingdom, the Manifest Destiny. Historians view the period as vital to understanding the development of the society, economy, culture, and politics of the modern United States. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 412 The Civil War in America, 1828-1877
The United States from the rise of sectional conflict through the disintegration and reunification of the Union. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 413 The Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1920
The political, economic, social, and intellectual development of the United States from 1877 to 1920. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 414 Gone with the Wind
For four years, another country occupied part of what we now think of as the United States. The Confederate States of America was a short-lived experiment founded on the cornerstone of slavery that advocated small government, states' rights, agriculture, and patriarchy. Even before the Confederacy collapsed, though, none of those ideals was working out well in real life. Why, then, do so many Americans have such a hallowed view of the Confederate experience? This class discusses some military matters but focuses primarily on the homefront. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 420 Dante's Comedy
The complete Divine Comedy will be read in English translation, with equal stress on each of its three parts: the Inferno, the Purgatory, and the Paradise. No prerequisite. (Same as HWC 410.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 421 Economic and Social History of Later Medieval Europe, 1000-1500
An introductory study of European economic and social history from the Tenth Century Crisis to the 1490s. This course investigates the causes of economic development and the interactions among market, nonmarket, and social institutions such as the family. Topics covered include trade, labor, technologies, consumerism, social unrest and the rise of social and economic thought. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 424 Venice and Florence in the Renaissance
Comparative urban study of Florence and Venice from the thirteenth through the sixteenth centuries. Principal subjects are the distinctive economies of the city-states, political developments, Renaissance humanism, patronage of the arts, family life, and foreign policy. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 425 History of the Mediterranean World, 1099-1571
This course examines Mediterranean civilizations from the First Crusade to the Battle of Lepanto. Topics include the commercial revolution, medieval colonization, the Byzantine and Ottoman states, shipping and navigation, and the Atlantic. Equal coverage of the eastern and western Mediterranean. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 440 War and United States Society
A survey of the American experience in military conflict, both foreign and domestic, from the colonial period to the present. In addition to the strategic and tactical aspects of war, the course will treat the political, economic, and social effects in their national and global contexts. Extensive use will be made of audio-visual materials. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 444 Frozen in Time: Politics and Culture in the Cold War, 1945-75
This course deals with the interactions between Cold War culture and domestic and international politics chiefly from the American and to some degree comparative perspective. It focuses on the period 1945-1975, and makes use of films, television, music, works of science fiction and related genres, and other cultural manifestations to examine such themes as programs of domestic and international repression, consensus politics, cultural imperialism, gender roles, and class, status, and racial dynamics in the context of what was perceived as bipolar rivalry. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 450 Study Abroad Topics in: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in History at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 451 Suburbia
A history of the growth of suburban enclaves, from their emergence during the electric streetcar era to their dominance in the late 20th century. This short course features the analysis of class dynamics, racial exclusions, commuting, social conformity and the alienation of the young within a U.S. context, but some attention is given to comparisons with other parts of the world. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 452 Chicago
A history of the Midwestern metropolis from its origins as a swamp to an industrial port city. Topics covered in this short course may include the meat-packing industry, political corruption and reform, immigration and migration, the rise and demise of neighborhoods, transportation systems, working-class social movements, modern architecture and urban popular culture. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 453 Anarchism: A Global History
This short course examines the key theorists and organizers of the anarchist movement, beginning with its emergence in the 19th century and extending into its reappearance in the 21st century. It traces developments in Europe, South America, Asia and the United States. Topics may include the Paris Commune, credit unions, propaganda by the deed, wage slavery, resistance to authority, and the general strike. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 454 Work
This short course traces the evolution of work from pre-industrial times to the computerized workplace. Issues such as the meaning of work, dignity and respect, time efficiency and exploitation, unionization and strikes, workplace democracy, collectives and worker-owned businesses, laziness as a form of resistance to authority, leisure, the culture of commuting, and hierarchy and status are explored. The evolution of work in non-U.S. societies is analyzed comparatively. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 455 Havana
This short course examines the history of the Cuban port city from the era of Spanish colonialism to the "special period" of shortages and deprivations during the 1990s. Topics covered may include popular culture, Caribbean pirates, cigar factories and labor, urban slavery, Chinatown, social revolution, restructuring of urban public space, suburban expansion, modernist architecture, tourism, gambling and vice, historical preservation and the changing conditions of streetlife. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 460 Topics in: _____
An eight-week course devoted to a specific historical topic. May be repeated for credit as topics change. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 461 The Asia-Pacific War, 1937-1945
This course introduces students to the Asia-Pacific War, which began with the outbreak of fighting between Japan and China in July 1937 and ended with the unconditional surrender of the Japanese Empire to Allied forces in August 1945. The course revolves around three themes, which are explored through lecture, discussion, and extensive use of film and visual materials: the geopolitical and colonial origins of the conflict; the concept of total war and the political and social transformations it unleashed on all belligerent nations; and the ideologies on the home front justifying the mass slaughter of soldiers and civilians. There is also discussion about how people in Japan, the United States, China, Korea, and other countries remember the war in the postwar period. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 470 Popular Culture in Latin America and Africa
This course offers a comparative assessment of the origins and practice of various forms of popular culture in the 20th Century in these two regions. Theories that explain the links between modernism and popular culture are discussed. Topics investigated may include the impact of spectacle on the urban environment, the legacies of colonialism in the sphere of culture, and the intersection of public space and popular culture. Forms such as music, cinema, street theater, and sports are explored. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 471 Social History of South America
The various republics of South America have experienced radical social change since the late 19th century. Compressed industrialization has propelled the accelerated growth of global megacities, mass immigration from Europe and Asia, and the rise of populist and socialist politics that address the needs of the working class. This course follows a thematic approach by examining collective violence, endemic poverty, shifting gender relations, labor conflict, public health, revolutionary movements, and dictatorships. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 480 Travelers' Tales of the Middle East
This reading-intense seminar examines the multiple visions of "the Orient" that appeared in the letters, memoirs, and novels of Western travelers to the Middle East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We examine the rise of tourism and travel-writing within the Middle East and their links to European imperialism. Working closely with primary source documents, we question what these highly personal and often misinformed types of writing can tell us about the politics and culture of everyday life in the Middle East. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 481 From Harem to the Streets: Gender in the Middle East, 1900-Present
This reading-intensive seminar examines shifts in gender roles and expectations in the Middle East during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The course begins with the importance of harem within Middle Eastern society, and traces Middle Eastern women's increasingly public presence in national movements, feminist activism, and peace protests as well as the impact of Western standards of marriage, child-rearing, beauty, and sexuality on gender roles. The course uses primary and secondary sources to analyze how gender identity is informed by religion and culture and grounded in specific historical moments. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Brown, Marie
MW 11:00-12:15 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 65867
HIST 490 Honors Course in History
May be taken more than once; total credit not to exceed six hours. Prerequisite: Approval of the Coordinator of the Honors Program of the Department of History. IND.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 492 Readings in History
Investigation of a subject selected by the student with the advice and direction of an instructor. Individual reports and conferences. Two (2) Readings in History courses may be applied to the major and no more than one (1) may be applied to the minor. Prerequisite: Ten hours of college history including at least two upper-class courses and a "B" average in history. Consent of instructor. IND.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
IND Bailey, Victor
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51921
IND Clark, J. C. D.
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51922
IND Clark, Katherine
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51923
IND Corteguera, Luis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 58697
IND Denning, Andrew
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 63466
IND Epstein, Steven
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 54257
IND Greene, J.
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51924
IND Hagel, Jonathan
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 62051
IND Jahanbani, Sheyda
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 56377
IND Ketchell, Aaron
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 65494
IND Kuznesof, Elizabeth
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51926
IND Levin, Eve
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 55008
IND Lewis, Adrian
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 58698
IND MacGonagle, Elizabeth
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51927
IND Moran, Jeffrey
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51928
IND Rath, Eric
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51929
IND Rosenthal, Anton
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51930
IND Schwaller, Robert
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 58699
IND Sivan, Hagith
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 51931
IND Vicente, Marta
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 58700
IND Warren, Kimberley
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 58701
IND Weber, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 56005
IND Wood, Nathaniel
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-4 56062
HIST 493 History Research Internship
The course allows students to work with a faculty mentor and learn firsthand the tasks that historians undertake to research and present their findings. Potential student assignments include database entry and retrieval, translation, fact checking, and compiling sources. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: At least one 300- level history course; declared major in history; and permission of the instructor. INT.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
INT Hagel, Jonathan
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-3 64551
HIST 494 Service Learning in History
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to apply historical knowledge and ideas gained through course work to real-life situations in volunteer service agencies and community centers. Open to History majors and others with significant History backgrounds. Permission of instructor is required. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 500 History of the Book
Brief history of writing materials and handwritten books; history of printed books from the 15th century as part of cultural history; technical progress and aesthetic change. Offered every second year. (Same as ENGL 520.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 502 Development of Ancient Greece, ca. 1000-300 B.C
Emphasis on the ancient sources and texts, developments in political institutions and society, the changing definitions of personal, cultural, and national identities, and the cultural tensions between Greece and the cultures to the west and east, especially Italy and Persia. No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. (Same as CLSX 502). LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 503 The Ancient History of the Near East
History of the rise of civilizations in the ancient Near East from the earliest time to the Muslim conquest of the early seventh century, including the areas of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Syria, Palestine and Asia Minor. An archaeological approach is used in focusing attention on the cultural phenomena and achievements of the peoples of these areas, including the Babylonians, Assyrians, Persians, ancient Israelites, Greeks and Romans. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 506 Roman Republic
An investigation of the history of Rome from its origins to the end of the Republic in 31 B.C.E., emphasizing political, social and economic aspects of the development of Rome from a minor city to a world power. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 507 Early Roman Empire
A political, social, and economic investigation of the early Roman Empire from Augustus to Diocletian emphasizing how Rome held together a world-empire until economic and military problems forced a complete reorganization of the imperial system. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 508 Late Roman Empire (284-527)
An investigation and analysis of the later Roman Empire from Diocletian to Justinian, emphasizing the Christianization of the empire, its division into Western and Eastern/Byzantine Empires, and the barbarian invasions. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 509 Multinational Corporations: The Role of Money and Power
This course explores the origins, historical evolution, and global expansion of multinational corporations since the 1880s. Particular attention is devoted to U.S.-directed multinational businesses with both market-oriented and supply-oriented direct investments abroad and the competitive advantages gained by American capital, management, and marketing expertise vis-a-vis foreign firms operating in Canada, Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. An objective of the course is to assist the student of international business in understanding, analyzing, and addressing various complex, interrelated and interdependent trends and issues in the world community that have had a critical impact on business performance in the international marketplace. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 510 Topics in: _____
A study of a specialized theme or topic in History. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Urie, Dale
W 03:00-05:30 PM BA 301 - LAWRENCE
2-3 63182
LEC Case, Steven
W 04:00-04:50 PM HAW 2030 - LAWRENCE
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
2-3 62376
HIST 511 Foodways: Native North America
This course surveys the traditional foodways of the indigenous peoples of North America. We survey hunting, gathering and fishing methods, meal preparation, medicinal plants and the cultivation of crops according to tribal seasons. Because modern indigenous peoples are suffering from unprecedented health problems, such as diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and related maladies, the course traces through history the reasons why tribal peoples have become unhealthy and why some have lost the traditional knowledge necessary to plant, cultivate, and save seeds. The course also addresses the destruction of flora and fauna from environmental degradation. (Same as HWC 551 and ISP 551.) Prerequisite: Upper division course on indigenous / American Indian history, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 512 Foodways: Latin American
This course explores the traditional foods, ways of eating, and cultural significance of food among peoples of Latin America. The course surveys the vast array of flora in Central and South America and the Caribbean, and focuses on issues of environmental protection, bioethics, food security, and the growth of farming and ranching. The class studies the impact that foods such as maize, potatoes and cacao have had globally, and includes African, Asian, and European influences on Latin cuisine, as well as health problems associated with dietary changes. (Same as HWC 552 , ISP 552, and LAA 552.) Prerequisite: Upper division course on Latin America, or permission of the instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Mihesuah, Devon
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
3 62410
HIST 513 Early Medieval Culture
The formation of a new civilization in Western Europe between the decline of the Roman Empire and the First Crusade is the central stress in this topical study of the institutions and ideas characteristic of the Latin West, 300-1100. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 515 The Crusades in Cross-Cultural Perspective
This course examines the development and evolution of the crusade as well as the history of the crusading movement from the 11th to the 15th centuries. Through an analysis of documents from Christian, Jewish, and Muslim perspectives, this course aims to consider "the Crusades" in the broadest possible context. One of the key questions to be addressed in this course is: how did these expeditions to the Holy Land both reflect and influence cross-cultural relations in the medieval Mediterranean World? LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 516 Later Medieval Culture
The civilization of Medieval Europe at its height (1100-1350); its subsequent disintegration and transformation. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 517 Roots of Human Trafficking: Modern Slavery and Africa
This reading-intensive seminar explores human trafficking in the modern world. It examines labor exploitation and commercialization in a historical perspective. The course aims to explore how imperialism led to the expansion of human trafficking and how women, men and children experienced labor exploitation in different ways. We examine how forced labor was/is behind the car and bicycle industries, sugar, coffee, and chocolate consumption. Today more than 27 million people are held, sold, and trafficked as slaves around the world. This course discusses similarities and differences between contemporary and historical slavery and analyzes why and how it persists nowadays. Readings include accounts of people held in bondage, case studies, and reports. Students develop familiarity with major historical concepts, themes, and subjects. Students also engage, investigate, and understand history as a process to explain how we make sense of the past and the present. Students carry on a research project throughout the semester about the historical roots of a modern case of slavery and/or human trafficking, producing original scholarship. (Same as AAAS 517.) Prerequisite: Successful completion of a history course numbered below 500, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 519 European Intellectual History of the Seventeenth Century
This course will trace the development of the European intellectual tradition in the crucial period of the seventeenth century. Such topics as the changing views on religion, the decline of Humanism, and the rise of natural science form the center of the course and will be studied against the background of social and political change. Class sessions will consist of discussions of both primary and secondary sources. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 520 The Age of the Renaissance
A survey of economic, political, social, and cultural developments in Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries, with special attention to those elements in the life of the age which look forward to the modern world. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 521 The Age of the Reformation
The Protestant revolt of the 16th century. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 522 The Age of Religious Wars, 1540-1648
The Catholic or Counter-Reformation and the wars of religion, including the Thirty Years War. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 523 Europe between Absolutism and Revolution
An investigation of why the major states of Europe underwent a crisis at the end of the 1700s that culminated in a wave of democratic revolutions, reforms, and the wars of Napoleon. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 524 The French Revolution
A study of the origins, development, and impact of the French Revolution, beginning with a description of France in the 18th century and ending with a look at France under Napoleon. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 525 France and Its Empire: From Acadia to Zidane
A study of modern France through the lens of its overseas empire and the relations between French colonies and the metropolitan "Hexagon." This course studies the establishment of New France in the early modern period, the relationship between the French Revolution and colonies like Haiti, the French obsession with North Africa in the nineteenth century, the "Second Empire" at home and abroad, the French role in the Scramble for Africa and the global age of imperialism, the participation of colonial troops in the world wars, the post-World War II age of colonial wars and decolonization, and the contemporary role of imperial memory and immigrants to France from its former colonies. Prerequisite: Requires a prior history course or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 527 Recent European History, 1870 to the Present
A study of the issues and themes that have shaped the contemporary European world, exploring European politics, economy, and society from the zenith of Europe's power and influence at the turn of the century through two world wars and into the contemporary era. This survey begins with the period of consolidation of a system of major national states in western Europe and ends with the search for alternatives to that system in the break-up of empires and movements for European unity in the post-World War II era. The course also considers the emergence of the states of central and eastern Europe and examines the impact of the Russian Revolution and the Soviet state on European affairs. Not open to those who have credit in either HIST 435 or HIST 436. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 528 Economic History of Europe
An introductory study of European economic history from the Middle Ages to the 1980s. Investigates the sources of economic growth, and the interaction between economic forces and social institutions. Topics covered will include the rise of commerce, the agricultural and industrial revolutions, imperialism, the Great Depression, and European recovery after World War II. (Same as ECON 535.) Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 142 and ECON 144. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 529 Intellectual History of 19th Century Europe
A survey of significant currents of thought during this period. Attention to the problem of the relationship between ideas and the historical situation. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 530 History of American Women--Colonial Times to 1870
A survey of women's history in the United States that will consider women's roles as housewives, mothers, consumers, workers, and citizens in preindustrial, commercial, and early industrial America. (Same as AMS 510 and WGSS 510.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 531 History of American Women--1870 to Present
A survey of women's history in the United States that will include radical and reform movements, the impact of war and depression, professionalization, immigration, women's work, and the biographies of leading figures in women's history. (Same as AMS 511 and WGSS 511.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 532 History of Women and Work in Comparative Perspective
This course explores the connection between historical changes in the labor process and the occupational choices available to women in different countries. Through discussion and analyses of texts, students will evaluate the construction of a gendered division of work as shaped over time by economic, cultural, and political forces. The chronological and geographical focus may vary depending on the instructor. (Same as AMS 512 and WGSS 512.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 533 The History of Women and the Family in Europe, from 1500 to the Present
This course examines how women's roles and the family have changed in Europe from the early modern period to the present. It will consider the relation of women and the family to such cultural, social, and political changes as the Reformation, the French Revolution, middle class culture, industrialization, and the mass movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 534 Captivity in America, 1492-1800
Captivity, threatened and actual, shaped the lives of the people of North America. It profoundly influenced the ways in which individuals and communities thought about themselves and the people around them. Colonists feared captivity among Native Americans; centuries later, Americans in the early republic rallied to the cause of their countrymen captured by Barbary pirates. This course examines the impacts, cultural, social, religious, and otherwise, of a variety of forms of captivity in colonial British, Spanish, and French North America. Topics in this course may include the captivity of European explorers and settlers by Native American groups; the enslavement of peoples from Africa to European and Native American masters; prisoners of war; naval impressment; and the displacement and captivity of Native American individuals and communities. Prerequisite: Successful completion of prior history course numbered below 500. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 537 France from the Renaissance to the French Revolution
A study of the major political developments of early modern France, including absolutism, corporate institutions, and popular revolts, as well as an examination of the everyday life and beliefs of ordinary people. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 538 European Intellectual History of the Eighteenth Century
An examination of the writing, ideas, and language of the major thinkers of the Enlightenment, including Diderot, Hume, Kant, Lessing, Rousseau, and Voltaire. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 541 British History, Tudors and Stuarts
An introduction to the impact on the British Isles of the Reformation and Renaissance; the development of the Tudor state; Parliament; the Stuart monarchy; the Anglican counter-reformation; civil war; the Cromwellian experiment. Prerequisite: A prior history course, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 543 Modern Iran
A history of Iran from the sixteenth century to the present with an emphasis on religious, political, and cultural history. Topics will include the establishment of Shi'ism as the state religion in the sixteenth century, the evolution of religio-political thought among the Shi'ite clerical establishment, great power politics in the nineteenth century, European cultural and intellectual influence, nation-building and nationalism in the twentieth century, the Islamic revolution of 1979, and Iranian politics since the revolution. Prerequisite: HIST 327 and HIST 328. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 545 British History from Monarchy to Democracy
A study of Britain's recovery from civil war; state formation and national identity; ideological conflict; the Revolution of 1688; religion and secularization; social stability and commercial expansion; reform; threats to the state, and the American revolution; Britain's survival of the French Revolution; the breakdown of the ancient regime in 1828-32. Prerequisite: A prior history course, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 546 History of Cartography
A history of mapmaking worldwide from its origins to the present day. Emphasis on maps as historical records of evolving civilizations and cultural landscapes and methods of study early maps. (Same as GEOG 519.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 547 The Intellectual History of Europe in the Twentieth Century
This course will examine in depth the leading developments in European thought from the 1920's to the present. Topics will include: existentialism, philosophic hermeneutics, and postmodernism. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 548 Rise of Modern Britain
A study of the rise of modern Britain from the 1832 Reform Act, a major step on the path from aristocratic government to mass democratic politics. It covers the politics and society of the Victorian era, the extension of British influence overseas, the origins and social impact of two world wars, the creation of the Welfare State, the loss of Empire, and Britain's entry into Europe. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 551 Spain and its Empire, 1450-1700
This course will examine the society and culture of Spain in the period known as "the Golden Age." Subjects that will receive attention include: rural and urban society, economic and political organization of the Spanish and American peoples in the early years of the conquest, the place of women in society, the social basis for "Golden Age" culture, and the debate over the "decline of Spain. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 555 British Political Thought
This course will offer an introduction to a number of classic works in British political thought, placed against their historical background. Close reading of selected texts will be combined with contextual analysis. Prerequisite: A prior history course, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 556 British Political Thought, Honors
Similar in content to HIST 555. This course will offer an introduction to a number of classic works in British political thought, placed against their historical background. Close reading of selected texts will be combined with contextual analysis. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 557 Nationalism and Communism in East Central Europe from 1772 to the Present
The peoples of East Central Europe under Hapsburg, Romanov, and German rule; the dissolution of the empires, independence and the role of the new states in the European balance of power; World War II, Soviet domination, and the recent role of East Central Europe in the Communist World. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 558 Religion in Britain Since the Reformation: A Survey
This course will deal analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the Reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and focuses on the theses of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. It is essentially an examination of religious history from a perspective of the history of ideas. (Same as REL 558.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 559 Religion in Britain Since the Reformation: A Survey, Honors
This course deals analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the Reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and focuses on the themes of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. It is essentially an examination of religious history from the perspective of the history of ideas. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. (Same as REL 559.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 560 The Value of Freedom
This course explores multiple definitions of freedom: its value, limitations, and evolving meaning. The course specifically focuses on four major contexts in which human beings have faced existential questions about freedom's value: politics, religion, work, and gender relations. The goals are to explore the ways in which other societies and epochs have valued freedom and balanced it against competing social goods and thus to attune students to the particularities of today's definitions and celebrations of freedom. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 561 Liberation in Southern Africa
This course examines struggles for freedom in southern Africa and the consequences of political, economic, and social changes in the region. The end of colonial rule, the demise of white-settler domination, and the fall of the apartheid regime is discussed. As a major political event of the twentieth century, the liberation of southern Africa had both local and global consequences. The course analyzes transnational issues of liberation and resistance to consider broader regional and international perspectives. Course themes pay particular attention to gender and ethnicity and include a focus on democratization and contemporary meanings of liberation. Prior coursework in African Studies is strongly recommended, but not required. (Same as AAAS 561 and POLS 561.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 562 United States Environmental History in the 20th Century
Americans dramatically changed the natural world between 1900 and 2000. This course asks how transformed environments shaped the American experience during a century of technological innovation, democratic renewal, economic expansion, global conflict, and cultural pluralism. Topics include food and markets, energy and transportation, law and politics, protest and resistance, suburbanization, and environmentalism's fate in a global information era. (Same as EVRN 562.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 564 Medieval Russia
Political, economic, social, cultural, and religious developments of Russia from the beginnings of the Russian state in the 9th Century through the 17th Century. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Levin, Eve
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 65870
HIST 565 Imperial Russia
The history of Imperial Russia from Peter the Great's reinvention of the empire in the eighteenth century to its demise in the revolutions of 1917. Placing Russia in a global context, the course examines change and continuity in politics, society, economy, and culture and looks at Russia as a diverse empire between Europe and Asia. Readings include historical scholarship and some of the classics of Russian literature. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 568 Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union
An exploration of the Soviet Union's creation, evolution, collapse, and legacy in contemporary Russia and Eurasia. Drawing on historical scholarship, literature, music, and film, the course examines the major trends and developments in Soviet politics, ideology, society, economy, and culture. Special attention is paid to how the multiethnic Soviet state's rise and fall reflected broader changes in the world during the "Soviet century. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 573 Latin America in the 19th Century
The course will analyze the social, political, and economic problems of the Latin American nations from their independence to the Mexican Revolution (1910). Emphasis will be on the emergence and shaping of the new countries; their transition to modern industrializing societies; and the impact of this transition on Latin American society. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 574 Slavery in the New World
Slavery, slave culture, and the slave trade in the U.S., Latin America, and the Caribbean will be examined comparatively. Attention will also be given to African cultures, the effects of the slave trade on Africa, and the effects of African cultures on institutions in the New World. (Same as AAAS 574.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 575 The Many Faces of Mexico
From Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas, to Spaniards, Mestizos, and Indios to Zapatistas, Narcos, and Luchadores, Mexico has been a place of vast social and cultural diversity. This class examines the history of Mexico and its many facets from the pre-Columbian period through the present. Students examine such topics as conquest and colonialism, independence and revolution, race, politics, and religion. Prerequisite: An earlier course in history or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 576 History of the Caribbean and Central America
A comparative examination of Central America and the Caribbean. Emphasis is on understanding the complex social, cultural, and political development of this broad region from the pre-Columbian period until the modern era. Topics include: conquest, colonization, racial and ethnic diversity, economic development, political conflict, and globalization. Prerequisite: HIST 120, HIST 121, or HIST 370. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 579 The History of Brazil
The history of Brazil from European discovery to the present with emphasis on social and economic change. Topics discussed will include the Indian, African, and European backgrounds, slave society, the frontier in Brazilian development, cycles of economic growth and regionalism, the role of foreign capital, industrial development, labor, urban problems, the military in government, and human rights. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 580 Economic History of Latin America
A study of the changing economic conditions in Latin America from Colonial times through the Twentieth Century and the effect of these conditions on Latin American society. Emphasis will be on the major theoretical issues of development economics, patterns of growth, and suggested strategies for economic development. Analysis will center on changes in agriculture, industry, labor, finance, transportation and technology, urbanization, immigration, role of women, export and commerce, and foreign involvement. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Kuznesof, Elizabeth
MW 12:30-01:45 PM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 65839
HIST 581 The Japanese Empire
Although the history of modern Japan was for a long time conventionally understood within the parameters of the nation-state, in fact modern Japanese identity coalesced around empire. This reading-intensive course explores the Japanese empire from its origins in the late nineteenth century to its collapse at the end of World War II in 1945, as well as the empires post-1945 legacies in Asia. Particular attention is paid to different forms of Japanese colonial domination practiced in Hokkaido, Okinawa, Taiwan, Korea, the South Seas Islands, Manchuria, occupied China, and Southeast Asia. We also study the ways in which the empire and colonial subjects, in turn, transformed Japanese state and society. Furthermore, we examine transnational themes the Japanese empire shared with other modern empires in areas such as colonial violence, gender, migration, settlements, war mobilization, and historical memories of the colonial experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of an East Asian history or culture course numbered below 500; or a history course numbered below 500; or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 582 Ancient Japan
Course covers the history of Japan from the prehistoric era through the ancient period (approximately 10,000 BC to 1200 AD). Topics examined include the rise of Japanese Civilization, state formation, early capitals, belief systems, courtly culture in the Heian period (794-1185), and daily life. Writing assignments provide students with opportunities to gain familiarity with historical methods for analysis and to strengthen their written expressions. Not open to students who have taken HIST/EALC 586. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 583 Imperial China
An intensive survey of China's traditional civilization and its history, with emphasis on the last centuries of imperial rule under the Sung, Yuan, Ming, and Ch'ing dynasties (to 1850). (Same as EALC 583.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 588 Japan, 1853-1945
This course provides an intensive survey of Japanese history from the arrival of Commodore Perry through the Pacific War. Social, economic, and political themes will be emphasized. Among the topics covered will be the Meiji Restoration, industrialization, Japanese imperialism, Taisho democracy, and wartime mobilization. (Same as EALC 588.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 589 Japan Since 1945
This course provides an overview of Japanese history from the end of World War II to the present day. Among the topics covered will be the Allied Occupation, postwar politics and social change, the economic "miracle," popular culture, women and the family, crime and punishment, the educational system, and Japan's place in the world. (Same as EALC 589.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 590 Cultural History of Korea
This course examines the cultural history of Korea in periods prior to the 19th Century. Special attention is given to varying constructions of cultural value, heritage, and identity, together with the historically specific factors that engendered them. (Same as EALC 563.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 591 Food in History: West and East
A survey of scholarship on food in the West and in East Asia, choosing works primarily by historians, but also by sociologists, geographers, and anthropologists. We consider how scholars have approached issues concerning food productions and consumption, what habits of eating reveal about daily life, and how and when food is embedded with historiography related to these topics, keeping in mind the famous maxim of the noted French gastronome Brillat-Savarin (d. 1826): "Tell me what you eat: I will tell you what you are. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 593 Modern Korea
This course will examine selected topics in Modern Korean history in the 19th and 20th centuries, with special emphasis on Korea's connections to China and Japan. (Same as EALC 593.) Prerequisite: A college-level course in East Asian history or culture, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 596 Defining Japan: Marginalized Groups and the Construction of National Identity
This course investigates the construction of national identity in modern Japan by examining the historical experiences of groups marginalized by mainstream society. We will explore the pressures of conformity, the pervasiveness of social ostracism and the surprising diversity in Japanese society. Among the groups discussed will be indigenous peoples (the Ainu, Okinawans), the Korean minority, the outcast class (burakumin), the sick and disabled, the yakuza, and political activists. (Same as EALC 596.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 597 Japanese Theater History
This course examines the historical development and characteristics of Japanese theater, with special attention to traditional theater and the genres of noh, kyogen, and kabuki in particular, tracing their origins in the pre-modern era and their continued performance today. To gain an understanding of the historical and artistic setting of these arts, lectures and readings will consider broader issues such as performance and ritual in religion and daily life, gender and representation, and folk theater. A portion of this class will include practical studies of theatrical forms including noh dance and kabuki music (shamisen). (Same as EALC 597.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 598 Sexuality and Gender in African History
An examination of the history of sexuality and gender in Africa with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Major issues and methods in the historical scholarship on gender and sexuality will be covered. Topics of historical analysis include life histories, rites of passage, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, masculinities, homosexuality, colonial control, and changing gender relations. Prior course work in African history is suggested. Graduate students will complete an additional project in consultation with the instructor. (Same as AAAS 598 and WGSS 598.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 599 The Rise and Fall of Apartheid
This course will deal with the last fifty years of South African history during which apartheid came to be formulated, supported, and perpetuated, and the forces that were responsible for its disintegration by 1990. Reference will also be made to the transformation process since April 1994. (Same as AAAS 590.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 600 West African History
A study of the political, social, and economic development of West Africa until the colonial era. Major focus will be on the role of state formation, trade, ecology, and urbanization in the formation of centralized politics from the 11th to the 16th centuries and the impact of the process of Islamization and Muslim revolution on political and socioeconomic change in selected West African societies in the 19th century. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 601 Oral History
This course explores the emergence of oral history as a methodology and focuses on the guidelines and ways to effectively use oral history in historical, journalistic, and social science research. The skills of collecting and sorting information gathered through eyewitness accounts, oral traditions, genealogies, investigative reporting procedures, and questionnaires are developed. The nature of the interview in relation to personal and public documents, ordinary conversation, and other related data sources will be considered in this course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 602 Religion in Britain 1785-1925
This course offers an examination of religious thought and practice during the transition from a pre-industrial, unitary order to a modern urban, industrial, and secular society. It will stress the close study of a range of selected texts, including works by such authors and works as Paley, Horsley, Wilberforce, Thomas Arnold, Newman Maurice, essays and reviews, Jowett, Lux Mundi, Gore, and Temple. It will attend to continental European influences on British thought and set theological debate in the wider context of the intellectual history of the period. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 603 History of Tibet
This course surveys the cultural and political history of Tibet from the eighth to the twentieth century. Through readings, lectures, and discussions, students gain familiarity with the dominant features of Tibetan civilization. Topics include the relationship between Tibet and the civilizations of India and China, Tibetan Buddhism, and the tensions between the struggle for Tibetan independence versus claims of Chinese sovereignty. The course also considers the Tibetan diaspora and the reception of knowledge about Tibetan civilization in the West. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 604 Contemporary Greater China
This course considers contemporary China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in comparative perspective. It begins in the early twentieth century so as to set up a comparison between Nationalist, Communist and Colonial China. It focuses on the evolution from the 1940s to the present studying the political, economic and social systems of the three regions that constitute what we now call 'Greater China' and considers, in particular, important points of difference and similarity between them. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 605 Medieval Japan
Course examines the history of Japan from the end of the ancient period (c. 1200 AD) through the medieval era (approximately 1573). Issues covered include the formation and destruction of the Kamakura and Muromachi warrior governments, medieval religious life and culture. Writing assignments provide students with opportunities to gain familiarity with historical methods for analysis and to strengthen their written expression. Not open to students who have taken HIST/EALC 586. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 608 History of Sexuality
This survey course traces the changing conceptions of human sexuality from early civilizations to the present. It will include, but not be limited to, such topics as attitudes and beliefs, laws, sciences and medicine, cultural differences, and the impact of economic change on sexual definition and experience. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 610 American Colonial History
Examines colonial American history from the age of Columbus to the mid-1760s. The course seeks to place colonial American history into the larger historical context, particularly the expansion of the British Empire in the early modern period. Emphasis in the course will be on migration, social and economic conditions, and inter-racial relations. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 611 Early American Indian History
This course will focus on the history of American Indians, especially those of the eastern woodlands, from precontact times to the 1830's. Particular emphasis will be on the response of Indians to demographic catastrophe, the development of trade between Indians and colonists, and Indian responses to European colonization in British America and New France. The role of Indians in the American Revolution and the changes caused by Removal will also be treated. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 612 History of Federal Indian Law and Policy
This course offers a comprehensive examination of federal legislation and court decisions in the United States that have affected American Indians. The history of law and policy will be traced from the colonial period, but the major emphasis will be on the struggle of American Indians to preserve sovereignty in the 19th and 20th centuries. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 613 Slavery and Freedom in the Age of Jackson
This course focuses on the growing importance of the issues of slavery and freedom in the United States between 1815-1848. Recently, scholars have demonstrated that the period was one of disorienting, dramatic, and unprecedented change as politics, economics, racial and gender roles, and key institutions were permanently transformed. The course will examine these changes and how they, in turn, remade the values and identities of all Americans. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 615 Rise of Modern America: Politics, Culture, and Society, 1900-1950
The history of the United States in the First Half of the Twentieth Century. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 616 Contemporary America, 1941-Present
A history of the United States from its entry into World War II to the present. A study of such selected topics as women's history and feminism, race relations and the Afro-American civil rights movement, power, poverty, the military-industrial complex, McCarthyism, and presidential administrations. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 617 America in the 1960's
The people of the United States experienced significant social political, and cultural change during the 1960's. This course studies the history of these changes, focusing on the American people, the institutions that shaped their lives, and the social and political movements, for and against change, that surfaced during this decade. Specific topics include: the struggle for racial equality, the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations; the Vietnam War, the antiwar movement, New Left, and counterculture; feminism's rebirth; the white backlash; and the resurgence of political and cultural conservatism. Course requirements include readings, discussion, and original historical research and writing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 618 History of the American West to 1900
A survey of Western history with emphasis on such topics as Native Americans and Indian-white relations, environment and resource use, exploration and discovery, expansionism and Manifest Destiny, economic development, urban, rural, and alternative communities, ethnic and racial experience, women and violence. Consideration will also be given to topics such as fur trade, mining, the cattle business, and agriculture. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 619 History of the American Indian
A study of Indians in the United States from colonial times to the present. Consideration will be given to the political, social, and cultural history of selected Indian tribes and to Indian-white relations with particular attention to the Indian point of view. Other topics will include a comparative study of Indian policy of nations colonizing in America, cultural intermingling and cultural conflict, and current Indian problems. Slides, films, and guest speakers (including American Indians) will be used in the course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 620 History of Kansas
A survey of the history of culture and society from prehistory to the present. Topics include Native American life, Euro-American resettlement, Bleeding Kansas and the Civil War, agricultural settlement, urbanization and industrialization, depression and recovery, and modern Kansas in transition. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 621 The American West in the 20th Century
A study of the post-frontier era and the struggle to create a regional identity, drawn from legends of the heroic past, varieties of racial and ethnic experience, political culture, and the possibilities of the land. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Gregg, Sara
MW 12:30-01:45 PM SMI 206 - LAWRENCE
3 68101
HIST 622 History of the Plains Indians
A history of the Plains Indians from the sixteenth century to the present. Consideration will be given to tribal culture and society, to the impact of the fur trade and international rivalries on tribes, and to Indian-white relations. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 625 Body, Self and Society
An intensive examination of the role of the human body in the creation of personal and social identities in the Western world. Students become acquainted with contemporary theories of embodiment and senses as they are applied to a variety of historical themes, and develop research projects on a topic negotiated with the instructor. (Same as HWC 575, WGSS 575.) Prerequisite: An upper-division course in History, Humanities and Western Civilization, or Women Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 626 Men and Masculinities
An intensive examination of the history and theory of masculinities in the Western world. Students become acquainted with some of the key theories of men and masculinities, and develop research projects on a topic negotiated with the instructor. (Same as HWC 570, WGSS 570.) Prerequisite: An upper-division course in History, Humanities and Western Civilization, or Women Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 628 American Economic Development
An introductory study of the development of the American economy from colonial times to the present. Investigates long-term trends in output, population, and output per capita, as well as short period fluctuations, and the variables and institutions that determined these fluctuations and trends. (Same as ECON 530.) Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 142 and ECON 144. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 629 The United States and the World to 1890
The origins of American diplomacy from the wars of the 18th century and the Revolution to 1901. The foreign relations of the American government and the reactions of the American people to international problems. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 630 The United States and the World, 1890-2003
An examination of the history of United States foreign relations over the course of the twentieth century. Treats America's emergence as a world power before World War I, imperialism and interventionism, involvement in World War I and World War II, internationalism, the Cold War and America's anti-communist crusade, third world nationalism, responses to a global economy, and the obligations of a military superpower in a chaotic world. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 631 The Contemporary Afro-American Experience
A history of Afro-America from the end of the Civil War to the present. Consideration will be given to such topics as America's capitulation to racism, blacks in agriculture, blacks and the labor movement, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, civil rights protest, migration and urbanization, Marcus Garvey and black nationalism, the Harlem Renaissance, blacks during the New Deal, blacks in recent politics, the modern civil rights movement, ghetto uprisings, and the changing relationships among race, caste, and class. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 636 Agriculture in World History
A survey of the development of agriculture from prehistory through the present. The major themes of the course will be how various methods of farming have spread around the world, how new techniques have transformed agriculture, and how peasants and farmers have interacted with cities and governments. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 640 Entrepreneurship in East Asia
An intensive examination of the history and current status of entrepreneurship in China, Japan, and other nations in East Asia. This course investigates the role of entrepreneurs in Asian economic development from the nineteenth century to the present, as well as the relation between entrepreneurship and Asian cultural traditions. The opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurship in East Asia today are also considered. (Same as EALC 520.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 646 Witches in European History and Historiography
This course examines witches, witchcraft, and magic in Europe in the late medieval and early modern period (approximately 1200-1700 C.E.). Particular emphasis will be on the variety of historical and anthropological approaches that have been used to study the subject and their meaning in the context of gender politics and gender theory. (Same as WGSS 646.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 649 History of Feminist Theory
This discussion course will cover the development of feminist theories from the late Middle Ages to the present. Reading will include Pisan, Wollstonecraft, Mill, Freud, Woolf, Beauvoir, Friedan, Daly, Kristeva, and others. (Same as WGSS 549.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 653 American Constitutional History to 1887
A historical study of the colonial origins, revolutionary development, creation of, struggle over and preservation of the American constitutional system from 1763 to 1887. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 654 American Constitutional History Since 1887
A historical study of the evolution of thought and practice of the constitutional system from the conflict over government regulation of business, through the expansion of executive and legislative power, to the evolution of protections of Bill of Rights guarantees by the Supreme Court and the reaction against that evolution. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 660 Biography of a City: _____
These interdisciplinary, team-taught courses survey the artistic, intellectual, and historical development of the great cities of the world. London, Paris, and Rome have been offered in recent semesters, and other cities will be studied in the future. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 661 Palestine and Antiquity
A survey of the history of Palestine from biblical origins to the Muslim conquest, with emphasis on such topics as social and religious institutions, cultural and communal diversity, and relations between foreign powers and local authorities. The course further explores the roots of the present conflictual situation in this part of the Middle East. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 670 Comparative Diasporas
This course examines history from the point of view of diasporas, groups who move across established borders but maintain an identity linked to an original homeland. This course examines commonalities and differences in the diaspora experience by looking comparatively at a range of prominent cases, including the Jewish, African, Armenian, Greek, Turkish, German, Irish, Italian, South Asian, and Chinese diasporas, the "Gypsies," and the internal diasporas of multiethnic states like Russia. The course also gives students the opportunity to pursue research on a diaspora of their own choosing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 691 Undergraduate History Honors Seminar
Required for students in the History major honors program, normally in the second semester of their History honors projects. Another seminar experience may be substituted, with the approval of the Honors Coordinator. Prerequisite: Approval of the Honors Coordinator of the Department of History. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
SEM Scott, Erik
M 01:00-03:30 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 65868
HIST 696 Seminar in: _____
A seminar designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of historical inquiry. A research paper will be required. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of upper-class courses in history and completion of HIST 301 or consent of instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Jahanbani, Sheyda
Th 12:00-02:30 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 58023
LEC Kuznesof, Elizabeth
Tu 01:00-03:30 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 58024
HIST 699 Philosophy of History
Topics will include: The nature of historical knowledge; the problems of historical inquiry; a critique of philosophies of history; and a study of history and related disciplines. (Same as PHIL 696.) Prerequisite: A distribution course in philosophy. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 705 Globalization in History
A study of the increasing interaction among world societies since 1500 and an investigation of the long-term developments behind current world problems. Major topics include western expansion since 1500, the spread of state sovereignty, the formation of a world economy, and spread of international institutions. The current world problems investigated will vary, but may include issues such as environmental crises, human rights, migration, free trade and the spread of consumer culture, ethnicity and nationalism, and international intervention within states. (Same as GIST 705.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 719 Colloquium in Medieval Latin
An introduction to Medieval Latin for students pursuing medieval studies. The material covered will include selections from various literary works, the Vulgate, law codes, legal documents, and other sources from the period 300-1500. May not be retaken for credit. Prerequisite: Four semesters of college Latin or the equivalent, and/or consent of instructor of Ancient-Medieval graduate advisor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 720 The Nature of Museums
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the kinds of museums, their various missions, and their characteristics and potentials as research, education, and public service institutions responsible for collections of natural and cultural objects. (Same as AMS 720, BIOL 788, GEOL 782, and MUSE 702.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 721 Introduction to Museum Public Education
Consideration of the goals of an institution's public education services, developing programs, identifying potential audiences, developing audiences, and funding. Workshops and demonstrations are designed for students to gain practical experience working with various programs and developing model programs. (Same as AMS 797, BIOL 784, GEOL 784, and MUSE 705.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 722 Conservation Principles and Practices
This course will acquaint the future museum professional with problems in conserving all types of collections. Philosophical and ethical approaches will be discussed, as well as the changing practices regarding conservation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on detection and identification of causes of deterioration in objects made of organic and inorganic materials, and how these problems can be remedied. Storage and care of objects will also be considered. (Same as AMS 714, BIOL 700, GEOL 780, and MUSE 706.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Baker, Whitney
Th 09:30-12:00 PM SRL 326 - LAWRENCE
3 69050
HIST 723 Introduction to Museum Exhibits
This course will consider the role of exhibits as an integrated part of museum collection management, research, and public service. Lecture and discussion will focus on issues involved in planning and producing museum exhibits. Laboratory exercises will provide first hand experience with basic preparation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the management of an exhibit program in both large and small museums in the major disciplines. (Same as AMS 700, BIOL 787, GEOL 781, and MUSE 703.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 725 Principles and Practices of Museum Collection Management
Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as AMS 730, BIOL 798, GEOL 785, and MUSE 704.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Keegan, Brittany
Nowak, Steve
M 02:30-05:00 PM KS-ST LAWR - LAWRENCE
3 51932
HIST 727 Practical Archival Principles
Study of the principles and practices applicable to the preservation, care, and administration of archives and manuscripts. Practical experience will be an integral part of this course. (Same as MUSE 707.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 728 Museum Management
Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museums as organizations; accounting, budget cycles, personnel management, and related topics will be presented using, as appropriate, case studies and a simulated museum organization model. (Same as AMS 731, BIOL 785, GEOL 783, and MUSE 701.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 740 Topics in History for Educators: _____
Reading and discussion of selected historical topics, designed specifically for K-12 educators. Pedagogical methods and resources for the study of history will be addressed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 747 East Asian History and Culture for Teachers
An advanced survey of the history, culture, and contemporary affairs of , China, Japan and Korea, specifically designed for K-12 educators who wish to incorporate East Asian topics into their classroom teaching. Pedagogical methods and resources for the study of East Asia will be emphasized. Topics covered will address relevant benchmarks in the state curricular standards in social studies, themes from the Advanced Placement world history examination, and the national standards in world history. (Same as EALC 747.) Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hope, Nancy
Greene, J.
APPT- ONLNE KULC - LAWRENCE
2 59570
HIST 748 East Asian Historical Materials: _____
The aim of the course is to provide students with the linguistic tools needed for archival research in East Asian history by assisting them in gaining experience reading primary and secondary language materials in Japanese and/or Chinese including texts in classical forms of these languages. After studying the rules of classical grammar and the particulars of historical materials as needed, students will read primary documents in conjunction with secondary readings in Japanese and/or Chinese. Fundamental aspects of paleography may also be introduced in this course depending on student need. Prerequisite: Capability of reading Japanese or Chinese and permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 799 Museum Apprenticeship
Provides directed, practical experience in research, collection, care, and management, public education, and exhibits with emphasis to suit the particular requirements of each student. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as AMS 799, ANTH 799, BIOL 799, GEOL 723, and MUSE 799.) INT.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 800 Readings in: _____
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
RSH Bailey, Beth
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 63324
RSH Bailey, Victor
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51935
RSH Baumann, Robert
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 62023
RSH Clark, J. C. D.
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51936
RSH Clark, Katherine
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 58702
RSH Corteguera, Luis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51938
RSH Clark, J. C. D.
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 60689
RSH Cushman, Gregory
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 56553
RSH Cushman, Gregory
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 60742
RSH Cushman, Gregory
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 54277
RSH Epstein, Steven
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 54226
RSH Farber, David
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 65344
RSH Forth, Christopher
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 58215
RSH Greene, J.
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51941
RSH Gregg, Sara
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 59691
RSH Jahanbani, Sheyda
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 56477
RSH Kipp, Jacob
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 55015
RSH Kuznesof, Elizabeth
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51939
RSH Lewis, Adrian
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 59795
RSH Lewis, Adrian
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 59020
RSH Lewis, Adrian
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 57060
RSH Lewis, Adrian
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 59794
RSH MacGonagle, Elizabeth
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51933
RSH Moran, Jeffrey
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51943
RSH Rath, Eric
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51937
RSH Rath, Eric
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 57577
RSH Rosenthal, Anton
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51940
RSH Rosenthal, Anton
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 58979
RSH Schofield, Ann
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 57650
RSH Schwaller, Robert
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 58704
RSH Sivan, Hagith
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 51942
RSH Vicente, Marta
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 55499
RSH Warren, Kimberley
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 56445
RSH Warren, Kimberley
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 58980
RSH Weber, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 58705
RSH LHeureux, Marie Alice
Wood, Nathaniel
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 59694
RSH Willbanks, James
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-8 57657
RSH Greene, J.
APPT- STUDY STDY - ABROAD
1-8 57047
HIST 801 Colloquium in: _____
Reading and discussion of selected topics. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Corteguera, Luis
Omwodo, Hannington
W 07:00-09:30 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 63784
LEC Brown, Marie
M 04:00-06:30 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 65836
HIST 802 Seminar in: _____
Research Seminar on selected topics. SEM.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
SEM Jahanbani, Sheyda
Th 07:00-09:30 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 61200
HIST 805 The Nature of History
Analysis of what historians do and how the profession of history has developed in terms of training, concepts, and practices in both research and teaching. Consideration also of the major controversies that have developed over historical method and historical interpretation, giving greatest emphasis to American and European historiography by providing a relationship to the leading concepts of world history. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 806 Studies in: _____
The core course for each thematic major field in the graduate program in History. The course, offered in a colloquium style format, will serve as an introduction to the principal standard literature in the field, and will consider the full range of methodologies or approaches appropriate to the field. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Welsh, Peter
Tu 05:30-08:00 PM BA 103 - LAWRENCE
3 59560
LEC Cushman, Gregory
Tu 07:00-09:30 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 65837
HIST 807 Professional Development Colloquium in Pedagogy
This course will help train future professional historians to teach. It will focus on a variety of pedagogical topics for future college history faculty, including: developing students' critical and analytical thinking; teaching research skills; promoting student involvement/participation; determining course goals; use of multi-media technology. In addition to attending class meetings of History 807, students will attend as observers throughout the semester one 500/600-level course in an area relevant to their future teaching and complete the readings assigned to the class. They will produce a course portfolio for an undergraduate course, including: a syllabus designed by the student; a set of assignments that will be part of that course, such as examinations and papers; sample lesson plans; an annotated bibliography of materials relevant to the subject-matter of the course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 808 Colloquium in Comparative History: _____
A readings-oriented course which explores themes in two or more geographic and/or chronological fields of history. The benefits and disadvantages of comparative methodologies will be analyzed. Topics will vary each term but may include the examination of such subjects as the history of urbanization, labor, colonialism, immigration, the family, political thought, or industrialization. Prerequisite: Varies with area of subtopic. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 820 Colloquium on Popular Culture in Latin America
This course examines the history and theory of popular culture in 19th and 20th century Latin America from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Some of the topics covered could include: the historical development of urban popular culture from broadsides and newspapers to radio and telenovelas; the politics of music from the tango to the new song movement; folk art vs. High art in the definition of national identity; cultural imperialism; sports and public rituals as spectacles for the working class; relationship between mass culture and the novel; gender roles and social order as revealed in forms of popular culture; and the politics of the New Latin American Cinema. Discussions will be in English. No prerequisites. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 822 Colloquium in the Urban History of Latin America
Explores the growth of the city and urban culture from the Spanish conquest to the present. Focus on such topics as crime, public health, leisure activities, artisans, unionization, residential patterns and transportation. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 823 Colloquium on Colonial Latin America
Explores the historiography and major themes and problems of the history of colonial Latin America. Ordinarily this will involve reading and discussion of historiographical articles, major works in the field and works involving new approaches and perspectives. A long historiographical paper will be required. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 824 Seminar on Labor in Latin America
Major problems in class conflict resulting from industrialization of peripheral economies. Focus on such topics as labor movements, worker-inspired revolutions, women in the workforce, the ideology of work, labor migration, occupational culture and worker's relationship to the state. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 825 Seminar in Latin American Foreign Relations
This seminar examines the history of Latin American attitudes and policies toward other parts of the world as well as among the Latin American nations themselves. Examples of topics of interest are anti-imperialism, Pan-Americanism, foreign cultural influences, non-intervention, international cooperation and conflict, dependency, transnational corporations, regional integration, international law and doctrine and national security. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 826 Seminar in Twentieth Century South America
Research seminar which examines major topics in the recent history of the Andean and Southern Cone countries. Topics such as the history of poverty, the dirty wars and the rise of military regimes, the social collapse of Colombia, Argentina and Peru, and the persistence of traditional cultures in the face of capitalist transformations will be thoroughly explored. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 827 Colloquium in the Social History of Latin America
Explores the historiography, methods and themes of Latin American social history from the conquest to the present. Sessions will focus on specific groups including the history of indigenous groups, peasants, slaves, women, families, workers, and the poor. A long historiographical paper will be required. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 830 Colloquium in Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Britain
This course examines the varied elite and popular responses to the creation of a capitalist economy (agrarian and industrial) in Britain between 1750 and 1890. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 831 Colloquium in Twentieth-Century Britain
This course examines the main developments in the political, social, and cultural history of Britain since 1890. The aim is to trace the relationship between political movements and socio-cultural attitudes and institutions. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 833 Colloquium in British History, 1500-1660
This course will engage with recent scholarship on the Renaissance and Reformation, the Civil War and the English Republic. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 834 Colloquium in the History of the British Empire
The course will deal selectively with themes in the political and cultural interaction of the peoples of the British Isles with peoples overseas, the expansion and contraction of empire, and the rationales for these processes. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 836 Colloquium in British Political Thought
This course provides an introduction to the rich tradition of British writings on politics through a close reading of a number of classic texts, interpreted in their historical settings. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 837 Colloquium in British Religious History
This course will deal analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and will focus on the themes of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 844 Colloquium on East Central Europe, 1772-1914
The colloquium covers the period beginning with the decline and partitions with Poland and ends with the outbreak of World War I. The major areas of study are the development of modern national consciousness among Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, Magyars, and Ukrainians, and the status of the Jews in these areas; economic, social, and educational development; and the rise of modern political parties. Prerequisite: HIST 557. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 845 Eastern Europe, 19th and 20th Centuries
The course considers the challenges of modernity in Eastern Europe, with a focus on the lands of the former Habsburg Empire. The course is designed to introduce students to major issues in modern Eastern European history and historiography, with an emphasis on recent scholarship. Topics include: nationalism, identity formation, anti-Semitism, modernization and urbanization, World War I, interwar nation-states, World War II, Communist takeovers, everyday life under Communism, dissidence, Solidarity, the collapse of Communism, and post-socialist transitions. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 847 Colloquium in Russian History
A group readings course that begins with Russia in the medieval period and continues through the end of the twentieth century. Topics may vary each term, but may include such subjects as political, social, religious, gender, or intellectual history. The course will focus around significant interpretive issues and the historiography that address them. Basic familiarity with the chronology and the main problems of Russian history is assumed. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 848 Colloquium in 20th Century Russia
The focus will be on reading and discussion of historical literature on the end of Imperial Russia, the Russian revolutions, and the Soviet Union and its aftermath. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 853 Research Seminar: The Atlantic World in the Early Modern Period
This graduate seminar will focus on interactions between the so-called Old and New Worlds in the three centuries following Columbus' voyages. The course will pay particular attention to the changes in the lives of Europeans, Africans, and the peoples of the Americas as a result of the emergence of transatlantic economies, empires, and cultural systems. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 856 Colloquium in Modern European History I - Renaissance to the French Revolution
This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in the history of Europe between the Renaissance and the French Revolution. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The first in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 857 Colloquium in Modern European History II - Major Themes in Early Modern History
This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in early modern European history. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The second in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 858 Colloquium in Modern European History III - French Revolution to the Present
From the French Revolution into the contemporary era. The third in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 859 Colloquium in Modern European History IV - Major Themes in Modern History
This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in modern European history. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The fourth in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 879 Colloquium on North American Environmental History
Intensive survey of significant works in the field from colonial times to the present, with attention to bibliography, research methods and needs, and leading issues in interpretation. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 880 Colloquium in Iberian World History
A graduate colloquium focused on a historical topic that examines from a transregional perspective the historical foundations, development, and colonial heritage of regions and societies touched by Iberian expansionism. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 881 Slavery in the Atlantic World
A graduate colloquium examining the historical roots, processes, experiences, and legacies of human slavery from local, regional, comparative, and global perspectives. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 882 Gender, Sexuality, and Family in Iberian
A graduate colloquium that develops theoretical approaches and examines historical case studies focused on the social and cultural construction of gender roles, sexual identities, family structures, and living strategies for peoples and places touched by Iberian expansionism. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 883 Ethnohistory of the Americas
A graduate colloquium that develops methodologies and examines historical case studies for the study of ethnicity, interethnic relations, and cultural hybridity from a hemispheric perspective, not only for indigenous peoples, but also for African-, Asian-, European-, or Pacific-derived groups, as well as new ethnic groupings and identities that emerged from their interaction. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 890 Colloquium in American History 1492-1800
Study of the leading interpretations of major issues in the history of Colonial and Revolutionary America, including appropriate attention to new approaches and techniques in research. The first course in the sequence of colloquia in United States history. Required of all U.S. history graduate students. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 891 Colloquium in 19th Century U.S
Study of the leading interpretations of major issues in the history of the United States in the 19th century. The third course in the sequence of colloquia in United States history. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Roediger, David
Th 04:00-06:30 PM WES 3659 - LAWRENCE
3 65872
HIST 892 Colloquium in 20th Century U.S
Study of the leading interpretations of major issues in the history of the United States in the 20th century. The third course in the sequence of colloquia in United States history. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 895 Colloquium in the History of Gender
This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of manhood, womanhood, and gender systems. (Same as AMS 835 and WGSS 835.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 896 Colloquium in United States Women's History
This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. It is designed to familiarize students with the most important and current historiography in the field. (Same as AMS 836 and WGSS 836.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 897 Comparative Colloquium in Women's History
This colloquium will approach the history of women from a comparative perspective through theoretical and topical readings on women in at least two different cultures. (Same as AMS 837 and WGSS 837.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 898 Colloquium in Material Culture and History
This course provides an overview of theories and methods used in material culture studies and their application to historical research, writing, and presentation. Topics may vary from semester to semester, but could include vernacular architecture, museum studies, anthropology, cultural geography, historical archeology, and perceptual theory. The course will consist of intensive reading, discussion, and written work. While it is not limited to a particular geographical or chronological area, or discipline, given the state of the field most topics will be drawn from U.S. history. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 900 Independent Research Seminar: _____
Design and completion of an independent project, culminating in the production of a professional-quality paper based on original, primary source research. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 901 Research Seminar in Global History
A research seminar oriented around cross-regional, comparative, and transnational aspects of history, culminating in production of a professional-quality paper based in original, primary source research. SEM.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 910 Seminar in Roman History: _____
A research seminar in specialized aspects of Roman history. May be repeated for credit. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 913 Numismatics as a Basis for Study of Roman Noble Families of the Late Republic
A seminar involving the study of the importance and influence of the noble families of Rome on Roman history (200-27 B.C.) with special emphasis on the literary and numismatic evidence. Reading knowledge of Latin will be essential for this course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 914 The Major Roman Historians
An analysis and criticism of the works of the most significant Roman historians from Sallust to Ammianus Marcellinus, including a comparison and contrast between the Latin and Greek historians who wrote during the Graeco-Roman period (150 B.C.-378 A.D.). LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 918 Elements of Latin Paleography
Introduction to the techniques of reading, dating, and localizing medieval Latin manuscripts. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 919 Seminar in Medieval Europe
LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 929 Seminar in Modern European History: _______
A study of sources in some restricted fields and the presentation of research results. A reading knowledge of French or German or some other modern language is desirable. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 930 Seminar in British History
A research seminar focusing on new, actively-investigated and controversial themes in British history, chiefly c. 1660-1832. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 932 Order and Disorder in Britain and America, c
The study of the history of crime and protest in their relationship with the wider social and political theory of Britain and America. Specific topics may include the impact of industrialization, the notion of the 'moral economy,' the legal and ideological nature of the death penalty, the crowd in history, and the administrative and intellectual developments in policing, prisons, and asylums. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 934 Seminar in Modern European History
A research and thesis seminar offered by several members of the Standing Field Committee in Modern European History. Students seeking advanced degrees in European history from the Renaissance to the present will enroll each semester for work on their theses and dissertations. May be repeated. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 946 Seminar in the Middle East
A research seminar in Middle East history, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The European impact on and relationships with the Middle East are stressed. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 949 Seminar in Modern Russian History
A focus on major problems of historical interpretation and research investigation from Peter the Great to the present. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 950 Seminar in Latin American History
A research seminar focused on a major theme or problem in Latin American history. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 951 Seminar in Latin American Revolutions
This seminar focuses on sweeping socio-political upheavals such as occurred in Mexico in 1910, Guatemala in 1944, Bolivia in 1952, Cuba in 1959, and Nicaragua in 1979. After considering various sociological and political theories of revolution the seminar searches for an understanding of the basic reasons for revolutions in the countries mentioned (and failure of revolutionary efforts elsewhere) and possible common characteristics of the Latin American revolutionary process. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 952 Seminar in Ideology, Violence and Social Change in Latin America
Research seminar focusing on the role of ideas and ideologies, values and cultural norms in the history of Latin America. Political action, including rebellions, movements and strikes by the masses and efforts toward social control by elites will also be a major theme. Finally the course will examine the meaning of "social change" for Latin America and when it can be said that "social change" actually occurs. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 955 Seminar in East Asian History
A research seminar in East Asian history. Prerequisite: Open only to graduate students having a reading knowledge of at least one East Asian language. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 962 Seminar in American History
A research and thesis seminar offered by several members of the Standing Field Committee in United States History. Students seeking advanced degrees in United States history will enroll in the seminar for theses and dissertation credit. May be repeated. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 964 Seminar in American Colonial History
An intensive, research-oriented study of American history from the 1580s to the 1760s. The course will cover both British America and New France. May be repeated. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 965 The American Revolutionary Experience
An intensive, research-oriented study of American history from 1760 to1800. May be repeated. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 971 Recent American History, 1920 to the Present
LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 973 Seminar in United States Women's History
This research seminar will focus on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. Students will research and write a paper using primary sources, and present those papers to the seminar for evaluation. (Same as AMS 973 and WGSS 873.) LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 974 Seminar in American History: _____
A research course focusing on selected topics in history. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 975 Seminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations
An intensive study of United States foreign policy during a selected period. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 980 Seminar in the Trans-Mississippi West
LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 981 Seminar in Environment and History
An inquiry into major issues and methods in environmental history, viewed from both an American and modern world perspective. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 982 Colloquium in the History of the American West
Study of issues and interpretations in the history of the American West from prehistory to the present, including attention to new approaches and techniques in research. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 986 Seminar in Historiography of Science
Examines the various patterns of interpretation influencing current historiography of science: the substance and impact of "internalist" history, which deals with the evolution of scientific ideas; the diversity of "externalist" history, which stresses interaction between the scientist's activity and social environment. Readings and discussions will assess intellectual, chronological, socio-economic, theological, philosophical, national, institutional and literary aesthetic influences on the history of science. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

HIST 998 Portfolio Preparation
Writing and editing of materials in the student's professional portfolio. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. RSH.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
RSH Bailey, Victor
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 60621
RSH Clark, J. C. D.
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 59776
RSH Clark, Katherine
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 59741
RSH Corteguera, Luis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 61917
RSH Cushman, Gregory
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 59094
RSH Epstein, Steven
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 63329
RSH Farber, David
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 65075
RSH Jahanbani, Sheyda
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 59069
RSH Levin, Eve
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 60578
RSH Lewis, Adrian
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 59790
RSH Moran, Jeffrey
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 59070
RSH Rath, Eric
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 65407
RSH Warren, Kimberley
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 59086
RSH Weber, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 60758
RSH Wood, Nathaniel
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-6 60759
HIST 999 Doctoral Dissertation
An inquiry into the source material upon a specific subject. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
THE Bailey, Beth
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 63501
THE Bailey, Victor
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 51945
THE Clark, J. C. D.
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 51947
THE Clark, Katherine
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 58216
THE Corteguera, Luis
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 51948
THE Cushman, Gregory
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 59748
THE Epstein, Steven
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 51946
THE Farber, David
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 65076
THE Forth, Christopher
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 59693
THE Greene, J.
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 56976
THE Gregg, Sara
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 59095
THE Jahanbani, Sheyda
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 56977
THE Kuznesof, Elizabeth
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 51949
THE Levin, Eve
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 55001
THE Lewis, Adrian
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 58188
THE Moran, Jeffrey
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 51950
THE Rath, Eric
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 51951
THE Rosenthal, Anton
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 51952
THE Sivan, Hagith
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 51953
THE Warren, Kimberley
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 56978
THE Weber, Jennifer
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 57626
THE Wood, Nathaniel
APPT- KULC APPT - LAWRENCE
1-12 56518
THE Corteguera, Luis
APPT- STUDY STDY - ABROAD
1-12 61706
THE Greene, J.
APPT- STUDY STDY - ABROAD
1-12 59143
THE Levin, Eve
APPT- STUDY STDY - ABROAD
1-12 63232
THE Wood, Nathaniel
APPT- STUDY STDY - ABROAD
1-12 59144

 

 
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